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Videos uploaded by user “Montana Historical Society”
Montana Mining Industry, Circa 1924 (Reel 1)
 
10:50
[silent] Early images of Montana mining practices include: downtown Butte; sawmill cutting timber for mine supports; workers going down into a mine; factory machinery; footage from a moving car within a mine; men working in mining tunnels; workers setting charges; workers eating; workers using pick; loading cars and driving them from the tunnel; using phone in a tunnel; men tending a flume; shoeing a horse; a horse pulling mining cars and men through a tunnel; men coming up from a mine; and men bracing a mine tunnel with timber. Circa 1924. (collection PAc 2018-45) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
This Was J.C. Penney: A Century of Main Street Department Stores
 
34:03
Since 1927, Sidney's J.C. Penney store--one of the oldest in the state--has been a commercial mainstay through good times and bad. David Kruger discusses the origins and growth of the Penney stores from their start in Wyoming to their spread throughout the nation. He shows how Penney's "Golden Rule" of "doing unto others" led to its incredible success. Kruger was born in Baker, raised in Fallon County, and hold graduate degrees from Kansas State University and University of Missouri. He is the agricultural research librarian at the University of Wyoming. Presented at the 2013 Montana History Conference in Sidney.
Montana Mosaic 1: When Copper Was King
 
22:11
This 22-minute video explores the profound impact of the copper mining industry on Montana. This video can be viewed as two shorter segments if desired. Segment 1 (10:55) focuses specifically on the Copper King's 1894 Capital Fight between Helena and Anaconda. Segment 2 (11:13) focuses on the tensions between laborers and management in Butte's copper mines in the early 20th century. These tensions paralleled the growth of unions in Butte. This video presents an overarching theme of industrialization during the period from 1892 until World War I-era Montana. http://mhs.mt.gov/Education/MontanaMosaic.aspx
The Life and Legends of Calamity Jane
 
45:32
Author Richard W. Etulain discusses his new book, "The Life and Legends of Calamity Jane." Scores of dime novels and movie and TV Westerns have portrayed this original Wild West woman as an adventuresome, gun-toting hellion. Although Calamity Jane has probably been written about more than any other woman of the nineteenth-century American West, fiction and legend have largely obscured the facts of her life. This lively, concise, and exhaustively researched biography traces the real person from the Missouri farm where she was born in 1856 through the development of her notorious persona as a Wild West heroine. www.montanahistoricalsociety.org
A World Apart: Montana's Hutterites
 
38:45
From promotional materials for the 1973 film: "A documentary film produced by MTN's Bill Whitsitt provides a glimpse into the life and thoughts of one of Montana's least known religious communities. The film - the first, and possibly last, of a kind - portrays the lifestyle of the Miller Hutterite Colony near Choteau, including views of the members at work and play, in the fields and in the classroom, with modern machines and with traditional texts of prayer." (collection PAc 2017-42) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
Colter Controversies
 
55:25
Author Larry E. Morris discusses his book, Gloomy Terrors and Hidden Fires: The Mystery of John Colter and Yellowstone. Guiding readers through a labyrinth of hearsay, rumor, and myth, this is the first book to tell the whole story of Colter and his legend, examining everything that is known—or supposedly known—about Colter. Historians and history buffs alike have tried in vain to get back to Colter the man, to know what he said and feel what he felt, but they have all ended up finding instead an enigma they cannot unravel. Presence of the Past Program Series, May 28, 2015.This program was co-sponsored by the Gates of the Mountains Chapter of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation.
Montana Mining Industry, Circa 1924 (Reel 2)
 
12:01
[silent] Early images of Montana mining and smelter/foundry practices include: a train pulling mining cars across a hillside; workers getting off a passenger train; workers standing in line; workers emptying mined materials from Butte, Anaconda & Pacific Railway cars; mined materials moving down a chute into a processing area; many rows of machines for processing mined materials; using water to separate materials; a crane moving large rings; molten metal pouring into a vat; machinery moving metal sheets; and men finishing metal sheets with intricate machinery. Circa 1924. (collection PAc 2018-45) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
Wood board with chalk message, from Smith Mine Disaster, Feb. 27, 1943
 
04:29
Hidden History Highlighted video #33 with Deb Mitchell, MHS Program Specialist, sharing one of her favorite items from the Montana Historical Society collections. Deb shares an unusual item which currently resides in our Montana Homeland exhibit: a piece of wood (Museum item #1985.38.01) taken out of the Smith Mine in Bearcreek, MT, following an explosion and aftermath that killed 75 men on Feb. 27, 1943. Coal miner, Emil Anderson, scrawled a message with chalk to his family just before he died from the poisonous gases that filled the mine after the explosion.
Daphne Bugbee-Jones: Montana Modernist
 
13:03
This documentary on modernist architect, Daphne Bugbee Jones was created by Pete Brown of the Montana State Historic Preservation Office. It features University of Montana art history professor, Rafael Chacon, Ph.D., and the photography of Terry W. Greene. The video includes Bugbee Jones’s biography, her civic achievements, and describes her influences and design intent for her eight houses built in Missoula, Montana, between 1960 and 1981. It also describes the paradigm shift in design that occurred in the 20th century and flourished after World War II. High quality photos that exhibit the homes’ interiors and exteriors are the first professional photographs of her work.
Mapping the Historic Susquehanna River
 
41:21
Rising out of New York, splicing through Pennsylvanian mountains, and emptying into the Chesapeake Bay, the Susquehanna River was a historically intriguing and contentious landmark for Native Americans and European settlers in the 17th and 18th centuries as the colonial frontier pushed into its watershed. Steffany Meredyk—Cultural Records Assistant for the Montana State Historic Preservation Office—describes her work on a project to create and share an online, place-based history of the Susquehanna by drawing on indigenous and European histories, archaeological research, and GIS mapmaking. (Presence of the Past Program Series, April 16, 2015)
Montana’s Charlie Russell: A Visit with Nancy Cooper Russell
 
19:13
Nancy Cooper Russell was the wife and business manager of Montana’s famed “Cowboy Artist.” Join historical interpreter Mary Jane Bradbury as she shares, using first-person historical interpretation techniques, Nancy’s version of Charlie Russell’s story as it relates to the Montana Historical Society’s world-class collection of Russell art (including the monumental masterpiece Lewis and Clark Meeting Indians at Ross’ Hole in Montana’s State Capitol).
Charles M. Russell: Russell Demonstrating Sign Language and Russell Funeral
 
03:23
[silent] Celebrated western artist Charles M. Russell demonstrates Native American sign language in Great Falls, Montana in 1926. The reel also contains footage of Russell's horse-drawn funeral procession through the streets of Great Falls in 1926. (collection PAc 2018-08) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
The Romantic Tale of "Tough Trip Through Paradise"
 
32:05
Tough Trip Through Paradise 1878-1879, edited by Ben Stein from the memoirs of mountain man Andrew Garcia, has remained in print since its first publication in 1967. In that time, however, little information about the original manuscript has been available, and certain questions about the veracity of Garcia's story have remained unanswered. In this presentation on February 14, 2013, Kathryn Kramer, processing archivist to the Ben Stein research collection (MC 376, Montana Historical Society Research Center), reveals information gleaned from the process of preparing Garcia and Stein's manuscripts and personal papers for public access, and explores alternative theories about Garcia's life and Stein's interpretation of the manuscript.
Blood on the Marias: The Baker Massacre
 
50:12
On the morning of January 23, 1870, troops of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry attacked a Piegan Indian village on the Marias River killing many more than the army’s count of 173, most of them women, children, and old men. Intended as a retaliation against Mountain Chief’s renegade band, the massacre sparked public outrage when news sources revealed that the battalion had attacked Heavy Runner’s innocent village—even after guides told its inebriated commander, Major Eugene Baker, he was on the wrong trail. In his book—from the University of Oklahoma—Bozeman author Paul R. Wylie explores the history of Euro-American involvement with the Piegans, beginning with the Hudson Bay Company in the 17th century and culminating in the tragic events on the Marias.
Frank Lloyd Wright In Montana
 
58:00
Helena resident Randall LeCocq makes a presentation based on his book, Frank Lloyd Wright in Montana, published by the Drumlummon Institute in 2013. He includes photographs from the Frank Lloyd Wright archives at the Montana Historical Society and Montana State Historic Preservation Office, and focuses on Wright's architectural style and his projects in Montana. These projects—important parts of Wright's architectural legacy and Montana history—include the 1909 Como Orchards Clubhouse and cabins in Darby, now part of Alpine Meadows Resort; the 1910 Bitter Root Town and clubhouse in Stevensville; and the 1959 Lockridge Medical Clinic, now the Morrison-Frampton Law Office, in Whitefish. LeCocq also addresses some unanswered questions on the uncompleted Bitter Root projects in the context of Montana's development schemes and Wright's personal life at the time. www.montanahistoricalsociety.org
Frank Little and the IWW
 
01:04:42
Franklin Henry Little (1878–1917), an organizer for the Western Federation of Miners and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), fought in some of the early twentieth century’s most contentious labor and free-speech struggles. Following his lynching in Butte, Montana, his life and legacy became shrouded in tragedy and family secrets. In her book, Frank Little and the IWW, author Jane Little Botkin chronicles her great-granduncle’s fascinating life and reveals its connections to the history of American labor and the first Red Scare. Having scoured the West for firsthand sources in family, library, and museum collections, Botkin melds the personal narrative of an American family with the story of the labor movements that once shook the nation to its core. In doing so, she throws into sharp relief the lingering consequences of political repression. (September 28, 2017)
Overview of Charles A. Bovey
 
07:00
Presented by Ellen Baumler
The Disastrous 1964 Flood in Central Montana
 
53:14
June 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the devastating flood that occurred in Montana. This two-part lecture explores the history and aftermath of the natural disaster. MHS Museum Technician Vic Reiman shares his personal reminiscences in Witness to a Deluge: Central Montana's 1964 Flood. Mary Guokas, Floodplain Outreach Specialist with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, presents a talk titled Fifty Years Later: Hindsight and Perspectives on the 1964 Flood along the Sun River near Great Falls. (June 14, 2014) www.montanahistoricalsociety.org
Taming Big Sky Country: The History of Montana Transportation from Trails to Interstates
 
56:06
The state’s major routes evolved from ancient Native American trails into four-lane expressways in a little over a century. That story is one of difficult, groundbreaking, and sometimes poor engineering decisions, as well as a desire to make a journey faster, safer, and more comfortable. It all started in 1860, when John Mullan hacked a wagon road over the formidable Rocky Mountains to Fort Benton. It continued until the last section of interstate highway opened to traffic in 1988. Montana Department of Transportation historian Jon Axline charts a road trip through the colorful and inspiring history of trails, roads, and superhighways in Big Sky Country. Presence of the Past Program Series, February 18, 2016
The Nehiyaw Pwat/Iron Alliance in Montana
 
01:06:31
Dr. Nicholas Vrooman sheds light on the Nehiyaw Pwat, a familial, social, economic, political, and military formation comprised primarily of the Cree, Assiniboine, Ojibwa, and Michif (Métis) peoples. This Aboriginal society paralleled the development and expansion of Euro-American society west of the Mississippi drainage to the Columbia Plateau during the nineteenth century. Presence of the Past Program Series, January 15, 2015
Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics
 
42:14
In 1915, western farmers mounted one of the most significant challenges to party politics America has seen: the Nonpartisan League, which sought to empower citizens and restrain corporate influence. Before its collapse in the 1920s, the League counted over 250,000 paying members, spread to thirteen states and two Canadian provinces, controlled North Dakota’s state government, and birthed new farmer-labor alliances. Join Minnesota historian Michael Lansing as he talks about his book that sheds new light on this little-known, but extremely important episode of America’s past. Presence of the Past Program Series, March 31, 2016
Aaron Parrett plays
 
04:07
Prior to reading from his book, "Montana: Then and Now," Dr. Parrett entertained the audience with some excellent fiddle music. May 8, 2014. www.montanahistoricalsociety.org
Mining in Butte (Reels 3, 4, 5)
 
07:52
[silent] Early images of mining practices in Butte, Montana. Circa 1920s. (collection PAc 85-87) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
Montana Mosaic 6: Federal Indian Policy
 
18:45
This 19-minute video examines the changes in federal government policy toward American Indians in the second half of the twentieth century. Focusing on the story of one particular family, the video looks at the relocation program of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the effects the relocation program had on American Indian identity. The video touches on the events surrounding and leading up to the formation of the American Indian Movement along with the movement's goals. Interviewees talk about their continuing commitment to shape the federal policy and to regain control over their tribe's futures. http://mhs.mt.gov/Education/MontanaMosaic.aspx
Montana Mosaic 12: Montana's Response to Global Conflict
 
17:04
This 17-minute video details the life of Jeannette Rankin as a Montana stateswoman. The video notes Rankin's early influences, her work as a suffragist, and her election to the United States Congress in 1916 and again in 1940. Rankin knowingly compromised her political career to uphold her convictions to maintain peace by being the only American congressperson to vote against both world wars. Her legacy towards working for peace continued through the Vietnam era until her death at age 92. http://mhs.mt.gov/Education/MontanaMosaic.aspx
The Piegan Medicine Lodge
 
23:31
A medicine woman holds a ceremony to thank the Sun God for the recovery of her grandson from polio. Scenes from the ritual include: tree cutting prayers and ceremony; selection and cutting of tree for center pole of medicine lodge; purification ceremony in sweat lodge; raising center pole and erection of lodge; ceremony inside lodge; dancing outside and stick games. The ritual takes place at Heart Butte, Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana. Produced in 1956 by the Montana Office of Public Instruction and the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The Montana Historical Society digitized Knute Bergan’s 16mm print of The Piegan Medicine Lodge in 2017, in cooperation with and at the request of the Blackfoot tribe and the Siksika Board of Education. (collection PAc 2018-06) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
The Work Is Never Done: Montana's Homesteading and Ranching Women
 
01:44:09
Presented by Dr. Ellen Baumler at the Montana Historical Society on March 6, 2013.
Gold, Sapphires, and Dams
 
36:53
Helena historian and geologist Martin Landry presents a history of the gold and sapphire dredging operation at Eldorado Bar on the Missouri River northeast of Helena. Owned by the Perry-Schroeder Mining Company, the dredge was subsequently used in the construction of Canyon Ferry Dam and in dredging operations in South Carolina and Colorado. (February 20, 2014) www.montanahistoricalsociety.org
The Rise and Fall of Open-Range Cattle Raising on the Montana Plains
 
32:53
Montana's cattle industry has been no stranger to the boom-and-bust cycle. Montana Historical Society museum technician Vic Reiman discusses the development of ranching in Montana from its beginnings in the 1850s—focusing on the less familiar types of cattle that populated Montana before the Texas Longhorns arrived in the 1880s—through the Hard Winter of 1886-1887 which spelled the end of the open-range era.
Stan Lynde
 
01:26
A salute to Stan Lynde, celebrated cartoonist, painter, and novelist, who passed away in Helena, Montana, on August 6, 2013. Produced by Beartooth NBC.
Bannack State Park
 
38:15
Assistant Park Manager Tom Lowe talks about the human and natural history of Bannack, Montana’s first capital and the site of the territory’s first major gold strike along Grasshopper Creek. Lowe describes the efforts by the Beaverhead County Museum beginning in the 1940s to create a park which led up to current preservation efforts as well as the documentation of bird species over the years. (Presence of the Past program series; co-sponsored by Last Chance Audubon. March 12, 2015)
Guiding Lights: Montana's Lighted Airway Beacons
 
52:12
During the late 1920s and early 1930s, the federal airway division installed a series of beacons across the country to guide pilots across dark skies. Today, Montana is the only state that still maintains these beacons, and the historic towers can still be spotted--day and night--throughout the western mountains. Presented by Kate Hampton at the Montana Historical Society on April 4, 2013.
Lewis and Clark among the Nez Perce: Strangers in the Land of the Nimiipuu
 
01:07:26
Nez Perce historians Allen V. Pinkham and Steven Ross Evans have examined the journals of Lewis and Clark with painstaking care to tease out new insights from what the explorers wrote about their Nez Perce hosts. Pinkham and Evans evaluate both what Lewis and Clark understood and what they misunderstood in the Nez Perce (Nimiipuu) lifeway and political structure. More particularly they have re-examined the journals for clues about how the Nez Perce reacted to the bearded strangers. They have also gathered together and put into print for the first time the strands of a surprisingly rich Nez Perce oral tradition. Presence of the Past Program Series, May 12, 2016
Lewis & Clark on the Marias
 
55:53
Glacier County Attorney Larry Epstein describes the fight between Meriwether Lewis’ party of explorers and a small group of young Blackfeet men on the homeward leg of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The encounter resulted in the only Native American deaths during the Corps of Discovery’s three-year trip. Epstein, a nationally recognized expert on this tragic event, was president of the Lewis and Clark Trail Foundation’s national group during the expedition bicentennial and currently serves as that group’s secretary. A fourth-generation Montanan, he grew up in Cut Bank near the encounter site, has studied the expedition since the age of eleven, and offers guided tours of the Two Medicine area. Presence of the Past program series, April 2, 2015
Greater Montana Foundation Legacy Initiative: Fred Pfeiffer
 
26:55
Interviews with longtime Montana broadcasters, providing a glimpse into their lives and the contributions they have made to broadcasting in their communities and the state.
E. C. “Teddy Blue” Abbott: The Texas Trail and the Open Range
 
41:05
MHS Museum Technician Vic Reiman shares the tale of Teddy Blue Abbott who came to Montana with a Texas trail herd in 1883 and lived in Montana for the rest of his life. Abbott recorded his experiences in his book, "We Headed Them North," which today gives us a rare view of what cowboy life was really like when cows were wild. (Presence of the Past Program Series, April 14, 2016)
George Catlin: First Artist Up the Missouri River
 
52:33
Missoula photographer Lee Silliman illuminates the life of George Catlin, the first Euro-American artist to ascend the Missouri River as far as Fort Union, Montana. In the 1830s Catlin dedicated his energies to fixing on canvas the lifeways and portraits of the “vanishing races” who resided on the Northern Plains. The evolution of his ideals, as Catlin struggled to convince his fellow countrymen and Europeans that Native American culture was worth honoring and protecting, is a poignant story of triumph and failure. (Thursday Night at the Museum, 4/27/2017)
The 1959 Yellowstone Earthquake
 
38:47
At 11:37 p.m. on August 17, 1959, a magnitude 7.5 earthquake rocked Montana’s Yellowstone country. In an instant, an entire mountainside fractured and thundered down onto the sites of unsuspecting campers. The mammoth avalanche generated hurricane-force winds ahead of it that ripped clothing from backs and heaved tidal waves in both directions of the Madison River Canyon. More than two hundred vacationers trapped in the canyon feared the dam upstream would burst. As debris and flooding overwhelmed the river, injured victims frantically searched the darkness for friends and family. Acclaimed historian Larry Morris tells the gripping minute-by-minute saga of the survivors who endured the interminable night, the first responders who risked their lives and the families who waited days and weeks for word of their missing loved ones. (Thursday Night at the Museum—September 29, 2016)
Greater Montana Foundation: "Lewis and Clark Meeting Indians at Ross’ Hole" (version 1)
 
04:06
A promotional film for the Montana Historical Society, created in conjunction with the Greater Montana Foundation. Historical Society lecturer John J. Jewell discusses the Charles M. Russell painting "Lewis and Clark Meeting Indians at Ross’ Hole," located in the chamber of the House of Representatives at the State Capitol. (collection MC 363) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
Montana History in 9 Easy Lessons: #1 Pre-Contact Montana
 
01:00:34
What can archaeology tell us about the earliest inhabitants of the place we now know of as Montana? Join Jessica Bush in an exploration of the Anzick Burial, the Hagan Site, and other significant archaeological discoveries that reveal glimpses into life here from 13,000 to five hundred years ago. About the speaker: Jessica Bush is the State Historic Preservation Office Review and Compliance Officer for the Montana Historical Society. She received her Master’s degree in Anthropology from the University of Montana, where her primary area of interest was pre-contact plains archaeology.
Montana Mosaic 7: The Golden Age of Montana's Resource Driven Economy, 1940s-1960s
 
17:32
This 18-minute video describes how Montana's resource-driven economy experienced its golden age following World War II. Jobs were plentiful in timber, mining, and agriculture. A booming national economy created a large American middle class with the means and desire to travel. Consequently, tourism became increasingly important to the state's economy. Federal government investments in highways and in defense (particularly Cold War era missile silos) also dramatically impacted the state's economy. While Montanans look back nostalgically to this economic "golden age," the video cautions that Montanans cannot assume its natural resources alone can support the state's economy in the future. http://mhs.mt.gov/Education/MontanaMosaic.aspx
Hotel Broadwater and Natatorium, by Jayden Peterson
 
03:14
Jayden Peterson, Capital High School, grade 12, reads his fourth-place essay, “Hotel Broadwater and Natatorium,” at the awards ceremony on February 26, 2015, at MHS.
Charles M. Russell: Photographing the Legend
 
01:15:26
Charles Russell's portrait is almost as familiar as the iconic images of the American West he painted and sculpted. What is not so well known is the story that unfolds through a comprehensive study of the myriad photographs of Russell that document a remarkable life while also reflecting the evolution of photography and the portrayal of the West at the turn of the twentieth century. Presented by Dr. Larry Len Peterson—past chairman of the National Advisory Board to the C.M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, and publisher of numerous books on Russell and the West—at Montana's Charlie Russell: 21st Century Perspectives on the Cowboy Artist, hosted by the Montana Historical Society in June 2015.
Montana Mosaic 2: Homesteading
 
16:53
This 17-minute video surveys the advent of homesteading in Montana with an overarching theme of immigration and its effects on the state. This video can be viewed as two shorter segments if desired. Segment 1 (7:45) begins by presenting some of the reasons settlers homesteaded in Montana and the effects homesteading had on Montana's Indian populations. Segment 2 (8:52) explores the story of a woman who homesteaded Montana at the turn of the twentieth century and links Montana's homesteading history to the present with commentary from the woman's great-granddaughter. http://mhs.mt.gov/Education/MontanaMosaic.aspx
Montana and the Sky
 
16:49
A program that discusses the daily use of aviation across the State of Montana, focusing on how the airplane has become an important tool in the development of a modern frontier. Provides a brief overview of Montana history, as well as the human geography of the state itself. Mail routes, business travel, recreation, medical flights, ranch use, wildlife management, forestry and firefighting are all addressed as important facets of aviation in Montana. Produced in 1952, and sponsored by the Montana Aeronautics Commission. (collection PAc 2007-67) The Montana Historical Society is the owner of this film and makes available reproductions for research, publication and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from the MHS Photograph Archives before any reproduction use. The Society does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission to use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.
The First Special Service Force and Helena: A Love Story
 
01:05:52
Learn how an elite force of American and Canadian soldiers came to Helena in 1942 to train for special operations in World War II and formed a bond with the community that lasted a lifetime. While these men are known collectively as the Devil’s Brigade, to many in Helena they are simply called “Dad” or “Granddad.” History teacher, historical playwright, and curator of the Jefferson County Museum, Terri Atwood shares the personal tales of these brave soldiers whose story is bigger than anything Hollywood could have imagined. (Thursday Night at the Museum, May 18, 2017)
Healy’s West: The Life and Times of John J. Healy
 
01:02:38
Through his incredibly varied fifty-year career, John J. Healy left an indelible mark on the Canadian and American West. Healy was a soldier, a trapper, a prospector, a free trader, an explorer, a horse dealer, a scout, a lawman, a newspaper editor, a speculator, a merchant, a capitalist, a historian, and a politician. He defied classification while defining the lifestyle of a frontier adventurer and buccaneer capitalist in the late nineteenth century. Alberta author Gordon E. Tolton discusses his book, about which reviewer Jon Guttman stated: “For those who have never heard of the man, Healy’s West should prove enlightening. For those already familiar with Healy, the reward is a further introduction to this unsung Westerner.” Presence of the Past Program Series, April 28, 2016
Norman Fox: The Life and Times of the Montana Western Author
 
01:01:10
Norman A. Fox, one of the most prolific authors in Montana history, sold millions of copies of his books; his stories have been translated into numerous languages and made into movies. After Fox died in 1960 at the age of 48, his work was largely forgotten. This presentation by the author's nephew, Barry Fox, discusses Norman's life and work, as well as the age when Western fiction was at its peak popularity. www.montanahistoricalsociety.org
Emma Goldman in Montana
 
39:04
Dr. Jeff Johnson examines speeches delivered by noted anarchist Emma Goldman in the Treasure State between 1908 and 1914. Goldman’s lectures focused on trade unionism, anarchism, the prison system, free speech, and the press. Her talks in Montana were received in myriad ways—Butte’s socialist mayor Lewis Duncan welcomed her while Helena officials deemed her “un-American” and halted a scheduled debate between Goldman and noted Montana socialist Ida Crouch-Hazlett. A graduate of Carroll College, Johnson is a professor of history and director of American Studies at Providence College in Rhode Island.
Witness to Spirit: My Life with Cowboys, Mozart & Indians
 
21:06
Bozeman author Robert Staffanson discusses and his new memoir. At age 94, Staffanson shares his unique journey of starting out as a "real" cowboy before being moved by music to start the Billings Symphony. He then moved to Massachusetts to serve as conductor of the Springfield Symphony. Returning home, Staffanson went on to co-found the American Indian Institute and become a renowned advocate for Native Americans and indigenous people around the world. Presence of the Past Program Series, May 5, 2016

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