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Colbert stays in character at congressional hearing
 
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Stephen Colbert testifies at a House Judiciary Hearing on the state of agricultural jobs in the U.S. These are his opening remarks The reason for Colbert's appearance was because of a program launched by the United Farm Workers: Take Our Jobs, which invited legal citizens and residents to replace undocumented workers in the fields. Colbert had used his program in the past to highlight this initiative by performing field labor for a day.
Views: 3565397 PBS NewsHour
Comedian John Oliver on making fun of serious news
 
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John Oliver's new comedy show, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, has probed, poked fun and raised serious questions about a variety of news topics, from India's elections to Supreme Court decisions. Oliver sits down with Jeffrey Brown to discuss being a comedian and not a newscaster, plus how he chooses his material and becoming more American.   Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/139JZdo   Watch more PBS NewsHour videos at: http://to.pbs.org/1e3qlFJ   Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/newshour   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pbs.newshour   Google+: https://plus.google.com/+PBSNewsHour
Views: 1180577 PBS NewsHour
The lives we lost in Parkland, Florida
 
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Funeral services began Friday for the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. We remember each of the 17 people killed on Wednesday, including the teachers who helped save students’ lives.
Views: 639867 PBS NewsHour
The psychological trick behind getting people to say yes
 
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Asking for someone’s phone number in front of a flower shop will be more successful because the flowers prime us to think about romance. Small, subliminal cues change our willingness to be sold on a product, on ideas or even a date. Economics correspondent Paul Solman speaks with psychology professor Robert Cialdini about his book, “Pre-Suasion,” the crucial step before persuasion.
Views: 1058265 PBS NewsHour
All the financial advice you’ll ever need fits on a single index card
 
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At first glance, fiscal planning can seem more complex and time-consuming than it’s worth. But according to Professor Harold Pollack of the University of Chicago, you can fit all the financial advice you’ll ever really need on a single index card. Economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a look at Pollack’s ten easy tips for simple and sensible money management.
Views: 1203379 PBS NewsHour
Watch Changing of the Guard at Arlington National Cemetery in 4K
 
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Twenty-one steps south. Face east 21 seconds. Face north 21 seconds. Twenty-one steps north. Face east 21 seconds. Face south 21 seconds. Repeat until relieved. Thus is the meticulous routine performed by the select few chosen for the honor of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, located in Arlington National Cemetery, just outside of Washington, D.C. These Tomb Guard Sentinels, elite volunteer members of the U.S. Army's 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, watch the Tomb 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, rain or shine -- and have done so for almost 80 years. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was constructed in 1921, after Congress approved the burial of an unidentified U.S. soldier from World War I, with other Unknowns interred since. The Tomb has been guarded year-round continuously since 1937, when the first 24-hour guards were posted. Since April 1948, sentinels from the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, also known as the "Old Guard," have been watching over the hallowed memorial. The above video shows a complete changing of the guard ceremony edited together from three different ceremonies all recorded on May 20, 2015. To watch the video at full resolution, be sure to choose the 4K option in the YouTube player. The video was shot and produced by Justin Scuiletti. Special thanks to Arlington National Cemetery and Sgt. 1st Class Nicolas Morales for helping in the production of this video.
Views: 1346083 PBS NewsHour
‘I am the president, he is the Boss’: Obama pays tribute to, jokes with Medal of Freedom recipients
 
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At the White House, President Obama handed out the Medal of Freedom to twenty-one notable American figures, from Kareem Abdul Jabbar to Bill and Melinda Gates, Diana Ross, Michael Jordan, Vin Scully, Bruce Springsteen, Robert Redford, and many others.
Views: 1229418 PBS NewsHour
(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman
 
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Aretha Franklin singing (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. in 2016. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 20604 PBS NewsHour
Watch President Obama speak -- and sing -- at White House tribute to Ray Charles
 
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President Barack Obama not only spoke at his final "In Performance at the White House" special tribute to Ray Charles, he also got up on stage to sing.
Views: 3432909 PBS NewsHour
The rise and fall of the American shopping mall
 
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From retail to e-tail, is Cyber Monday the new Black Friday? Indoor malls have been in decline ever since consumers discovered online shopping, and many retail spaces are either closing or being repurposed as shopping habits evolve. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on the fate of America’s malls from Akron, Ohio.
Views: 483631 PBS NewsHour
Your phone is trying to control your life
 
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Whether you're killing time in line at Starbucks or scrolling through an endless meme stream on Twitter, your smartphone is trying to seduce you. Former Google employee Tristan Harris felt something needed to be done to combat tech designers' relentless efforts to influence our behavior. Special correspondent Cat Wise talks to Harris as part of a collaboration with The Atlantic.
Views: 271162 PBS NewsHour
Shields and Brooks on ‘reality show’ rules and midterm prospects
 
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Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including how President Trump has "politicized" security clearances, the rules of a reality TV White House and why diversity and loyalty to the administration will be two top issues in November’s elections. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 116335 PBS NewsHour
This cement alternative absorbs CO2 like a sponge
 
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Cement has been called the foundation of modern civilization, the stuff of highways, bridges, sidewalks and buildings of all sizes. But its production comes with a huge carbon footprint. Environmental chemist David Stone was seeking a way to keep iron from rusting when he stumbled upon a possible substitute that requires significantly less energy. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports. Read the full transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/cement-alternative-absorbs-carbon-dioxide-like-sponge/
Views: 125048 PBS NewsHour
Why foreign retirees are flocking to Mexico
 
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In Mexico, seniors are traditionally cared for in the homes of relatives. But a boom of foreign retirees, many of them Americans, have begun moving to Mexico to live out their years, paying much less for independent and assisted living than in other countries. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports.
Views: 560521 PBS NewsHour
Poet Sarah Kay’s ‘Brief but Spectacular’ take on poetry
 
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If you had two minutes to give the world your take, what would you say? Each week, PBS NewsHour's new series “Brief but Spectacular” will feature some of the brightest minds of today, offering passionate takes on topics they know well. The first installment features poet Sarah Kay’s take on gratitude.
Views: 32726 PBS NewsHour
Why Kentucky farmers are quitting tobacco and turning to hemp
 
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A Farm Bill passed by Congress last year included an amendment granting states and universities the right to research hemp. Several states have since started research projects, but Kentucky is at the forefront, experimenting with creating a new industry around this plant. NewsHour's Christopher Booker reports. View the Full Story/Transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/kentucky-farmers-quitting-tobacco-turning-unlikely-new-crop/
Views: 736908 PBS NewsHour
Drummer Bill Kreutzmann on drugs, money and the end of the Grateful Dead
 
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PBS NewsHour Chief Arts and Culture Correspondent Jeffrey Brown talks with founding member of the Grateful Dead Bill Kreutzmann about first meeting Jerry Garcia and deciding to follow him for the rest of his life. They discuss candidly how drugs and money took their toll on the band. Kreutzmann explains how their fans, known as Deadheads, were as central to the band’s success as the music. Although the Grateful Dead played their final concerts this weekend at Soldier Field in Chicago, Kreutzmann says he wishes they could keep playing.
Views: 457951 PBS NewsHour
Brooks and Klein on 2018 election security threats, Koch-Trump brawl
 
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New York Times columnist David Brooks and Ezra Klein of Vox join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including the contrast between President Trump’s lambasting of the Russia investigation and his administration’s heightened warnings about election threats, plus a fringe internet conspiracy theory surfaces at a Trump rally and the rift between Trump and the influential Koch network. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 103249 PBS NewsHour
What Cuba can teach America about organic farming
 
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Many people in America are proponents of the organic food movement, and worried about the potentially harmful effects of pesticides on their health or the environment. In Cuba, farmers have gone organic for a very different reason – they had to. In this final instalment of our series “The Cuban Evoltion” Jeffrey Brown looks at food and farming. View the full transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/cuba-can-teach-america-farming/#transcript
Views: 87772 PBS NewsHour
Can you cook delicious meals on just $4 a day?
 
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Can someone receiving food stamp benefits eat well on an average budget of $4 per day? That was the simple question that Leanne Brown set out to answer as a student, and now it's the core of her new cookbook, "Good and Cheap." With Thanksgiving approaching, William Brangham follows Brown in the grocery store and the kitchen to learn more about her recipes. View the Full Story/Transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/can-you-cook-delicious-meals-on-just-4-a-day/
Views: 93773 PBS NewsHour
Why getting a college degree doesn't always pay off
 
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Today college is seen as crucial for career success and prosperity. "Will College Pay Off?" is a new book by Peter Cappelli, and the answer, he suggests, is that it depends -- on the price tag, how fast a student finishes and what job they get afterwards. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Cappelli about finding an educational path that makes financial sense. View the full story/transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/getting-college-degree-doesnt-always-pay/#transcript
Views: 89281 PBS NewsHour
Why does almost half of America’s food go to waste?
 
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Roughly 40 percent of food produced in America never makes it to the table. Whether it rots in the field, is trashed at the supermarket, or thrown out at home, NPR’s Allison Aubrey looks at why good food is being discarded, and what can be done to prevent it.
Views: 94118 PBS NewsHour
Cohousing communities help prevent social isolation
 
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Groups in Denmark and the U.S. are choosing to live in intentionally intergenerational communities, which emerged to strengthen social ties between aging seniors and their younger counterparts who are balancing work and family. People living in them say the model fosters an interdependent environment and helps everyone feel more comfortable with the process of getting older. NewsHour Weekend's Saskia de Melker reports.
Views: 157302 PBS NewsHour
Brutal Job Search Reality for Older Americans Out of Work
 
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Bit.ly/WorkAdventures | Despite a rosier jobs picture in April, for Americans ages 55 or older who have been unemployed long-term, the prospect of finding work is greatly limited. Economic correspondent Paul Solman explores why older workers face joblessness and considerable financial strain. This video is part of our special interactive project, New Adventures for Older Workers: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/new-older-workers/chapter-1-rethinking-retirement
Views: 124489 PBS NewsHour
Exhibit illuminates the divine art of the Quran
 
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A major exhibition on the art of the Quran is being billed as the first of its kind in the U.S. Sixty-eight of the most important and exquisite Qurans ever produced are on view now at the Smithsonian’s Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C. Jeffrey Brown reports on the vast variety of the manuscripts on display and the beauty, history and hard work behind each masterpiece.
Views: 537397 PBS NewsHour
Novelist Paul Beatty pokes fun at how we talk about race in America
 
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Paul Beatty’s new book “The Sellout” offers a satirical skewering of racial politics in America. Jeffrey Brown speaks with the author about not being afraid to say taboo things and the ways the U.S. is still segregated. Read the full transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/paul-beatty-sellout/#transcript
Views: 14628 PBS NewsHour
'The Learning' Follows Teachers From the Philippines to Baltimore
 
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In the new documentary, "The Learning," filmmaker Ramona Diaz follows four Filipina women facing their first year as teachers in Baltimore's public schools. This excerpt is part of The Economist Film Project, a series of independently produced films aired in partnership between The Economist and the NewsHour.
Views: 189022 PBS NewsHour
High rents force some in Silicon Valley to live in vehicles
 
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Faced with some of the most expensive rental housing in the nation, some Bay Area residents are feeling priced out and are seeking low-cost alternatives. In Silicon Valley, a hub of computer and technology companies, some people are even turning to cars, vans and RVs for housing. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Joanne Elgart Jennings has the story.
Views: 845312 PBS NewsHour
Achebe Discusses Africa 50 Years After 'Things Fall Apart'
 
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A half century after Chinua Achebe penned 'Things Fall Apart', Jeffrey Brown discusses Africa's ongoing story with the famed author. Originally aired May 27, 2008. Read more: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/entertainment/jan-june08/achebe_05-27.html
Views: 127362 PBS NewsHour
Remembering Aretha Franklin, the soulful voice of our time
 
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A legend is gone. Aretha Franklin, the “Queen of Soul,” died Thursday at age 76 in Detroit from pancreatic cancer. One of the best-selling musical artists of all times, she defined a generation of music with countless hits like “Think” and “Respect.” Judy Woodruff gets remembrances from Chris Richards of the Washington Post and opera singer Grace Bumbry. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 41615 PBS NewsHour
Iowa Writers' Workshop, Famous for Training Top Writers, Turns 75
 
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Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/fAWdFj Jeffrey Brown reports on the Iowa Writers' Workshop, the nation's oldest and most prestigious postgraduate writing program for elite writers and poets. The workshop celebrates its 75th anniversary this year.
Views: 16298 PBS NewsHour
What we learned from Paul Manafort trial opening statements
 
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Paul Manafort, the first defendant charged by special counsel Robert Mueller to go to trial, is accused of working as an unregistered lobbyist for several pro-Russian politicians in Ukraine. William Brangham joins John Yang from the courthouse in Alexandria, Virginia, to explain the contours of the case so far. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 84442 PBS NewsHour
‘Daily Show’ host Trevor Noah turns an outside perspective into funny observation
 
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As “The Daily Show” host, South-African born comic Trevor Noah offers a different, outsider’s perspective from Jon Stewart, the man he succeeded. Noah speaks with Jeffrey Brown about how the show is handling the election of Donald Trump and how his personal experience, detailed in his new memoir “Born a Crime,” informs his understanding of struggles in the U.S.
Views: 276612 PBS NewsHour
Why the Sioux Are Refusing $1.3 Billion
 
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Members of the Great Sioux Nation could pocket a large sum set aside by the government for taking the resource-rich Black Hills away from the tribes in 1877. But leaders say the sacred land was never, and still isn't, for sale.
Views: 303744 PBS NewsHour
Uncovering the problem of forced marriage in the U.S.
 
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She was never verbally or physically threatened or restrained. But at age 19, Nina Van Harn felt like she couldn’t say no when she was expected to marry a man chosen by her family. And she is not alone in her experience. In a two-year period, it’s estimated that there were 3,000 such forced marriage cases in the United States. Special correspondent Gayle Tzemach Lemmon reports.
Views: 540253 PBS NewsHour
Rethinking the utility company as solar power heats up
 
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The plummeting price of solar panels has led to a boom of customers and solar industry jobs. What does it mean for the evolution of utility companies? William Brangham reports.
Views: 23940 PBS NewsHour
Why adjunct professors are struggling to make ends meet
 
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Juggling multiple part-time jobs, earning little-to-no benefits, depending on public assistance: This is the financial reality for many adjunct professors across the nation. Economics correspondent Paul Solman looks for the origins of this growing employment trend at colleges and universities.
Views: 120985 PBS NewsHour
Amy Walter and Susan Page on Trump’s shutdown threat, GOP midterm concerns
 
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Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and Susan Page of USA Today join Judy Woodruff to discuss President Trump’s suggestions that he might force a government shutdown over his immigration demands and the potential political fallout for Republicans in the midterm elections, plus Sen. Rand Paul’s decision to vote to approve Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 27757 PBS NewsHour
How Does Goldman Sachs Make Its Profits? (Part 1)
 
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PBS NewsHour Correspondent Paul Solman explores the secretive inner workings of Goldman Sachs. For more, visit http://www.pbs.org/newshour/economy/makingsense
Views: 247253 PBS NewsHour
Shields and Ponnuru on G-7 trade tensions, Trump-Kim summit expectations
 
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Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Ramesh Ponnuru of The National Review join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including tensions between the U.S. and allies at the G7 summit, as well as President Trump’s comments that Russia should be welcomed back, the upcoming North Korea summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un and takeaways from the biggest primary night of the year. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 100118 PBS NewsHour
Robin Williams had a disease that mimics Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and schizophrenia
 
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According to Robin Williams’ widow, an autopsy has revealed that the comedian suffered from Lewy body dementia before he committed suicide. Susan Schneider Williams described the battle to treat and understand her late husband's symptoms as a game of Whac-A-Mole. William Brangham learns about the lesser-known but common illness from Dr. James Galvin of Florida Atlantic University. View the Full Story/Transcript: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/robin-williams-disease-mimics-alzheimers-parkinsons-schizophrenia/
Views: 16516 PBS NewsHour
Is Applying for Jobs Online an Effective Way to Find Work?
 
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For more coverage: http://to.pbs.org/SQm4pJ With a bad economy and nearly everyone on the internet, one job opening promoted online can receive thousands of applications. So with competition fierce and many firms using software rather than human beings to hire, Paul Solman explores whether it is worth it to apply online or if there are better strategies to get employed.
Views: 61277 PBS NewsHour
How these Alabama architecture students are improving lives with low-cost home designs
 
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For decades, students and faculty from Auburn University's Rural Studio have been working, studying and living in Hale County, Alabama, and using architecture to serve the greater good. There, more than two dozen different homes that cost only $20,000 have been designed, constructed and given to residents. John Yang reports as part of our ongoing series, Chasing the Dream. Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 13730 PBS NewsHour
Why Mister Rogers was ‘the least likely TV star of all time’
 
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Millions loved Fred Rogers and his neighborhood. Filmmaker Morgan Neville watched the iconic PBS show as a kid, and then rewatched it as an adult. He found something worth celebrating, a voice that he says he doesn't hear in our culture anymore. Jeffrey Brown takes a look at his new film, "Won't You Be My Neighbor." Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 6373 PBS NewsHour
Here’s proof that open office layouts don’t work, and how to fix them
 
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The basic logic behind the open offices is that tearing down physical barriers inspires communication and collective creativity. But there is little evidence to support these widespread claims — and some surveys show the opposite: declines in employee satisfaction and productivity. Now, two behavior researchers from Harvard University have tackled this problem head on, by directly measuring more than 100,000 face-to-face conversations at two Fortune 500 companies — before and after their global headquarters switched to open office layouts. The team found open office layouts dramatically cut employees’ face-to-face conversations at these companies — by as much as 70 percent. READ MORE: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/heres-proof-that-open-office-layouts-dont-work-and-how-to-fix-them Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 92388 PBS NewsHour
BMW plant in S.C. imports German apprenticeship program.
 
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The BMW factory in Spartanburg, South Carolina, is luring workers with a program that offers part-time work, an all-expenses paid associates degree and near guarantee of a job and future education down the road. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on how such apprenticeships, modeled after European programs, may boost employment and help tailor curricula to employers' needs.
Views: 68762 PBS NewsHour
In Hypercompetitive South Korea, Pressures Mount on Young Pupils
 
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Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/fu0XXw Margaret Warner reports from Seoul, where extraordinary student commitment has helped the nation's 15 year olds rank second in the world in reading and fourth in math, well ahead of their American counterparts. Many students take private lessons in addition to required coursework, but the pressure can create serious stress.
Views: 91084 PBS NewsHour
'Russians Conquered My Heart': Pianist Van Cliburn Reflects on 50 Years of Music Making
 
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Van Cliburn Reflects on 1958 Tchaikovsky Competition Master pianist Van Cliburn reflects on his historic victory at the 1958 Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in Moscow and on the vitality of the classical arts. This interview first aired on PBS NewsHour April 11, 2008.
Views: 54913 PBS NewsHour
Ballerina Misty Copeland stands out in world of white swans
 
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In a ballet world filled with white swans, Misty Copeland stands out. As the first African-American female to hold the rank of Soloist at American Ballet Theater in 20 years, Copeland has had an improbable rise. In her new memoir “Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina,” Copeland recounts that journey from poverty to the spotlight of one of America's top ballet companies.
Views: 170324 PBS NewsHour
'The History of American Graffiti': From Subway to Gallery
 
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For more on this story, visit Art Beat: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/ Art Beat talks to Caleb Neelon and Roger Gastman, authors of "The History of American Graffiti," a book that charts the history of the art form in the United States.
Views: 95150 PBS NewsHour