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Using a Micropipette - University of Leicester
 
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A short film showing how to use a Gilson Micropipette. The film was made to support the teaching of undergraduate Biological Science students at the University of Leicester. The film was produced by GENIE, based within the Genetics Department at the University of Leicester. Further information and materials can be found on the GENIE web site http://www.le.ac.uk/genie and the GENIE VGEC web site http://www.le.ac.uk/vgec The film was directed by Jon Shears of ITS-Multimedia Services and the film was produced by Raymond Dalgleish, Nicola Suter-Giorgini and Cas Kramer.
Views: 358000 University of Leicester
Examination of the Cranial Nerves - Demonstration
 
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A second more detailed video can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam/cranial This is a real-time demonstration illustrating technique and patient interaction involved in the Examination of the Cranial Nerves. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Richard Abbott MD FRCP Consultant Neurologist. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 666192 University of Leicester
Richard III - Injuries to the Remains
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii - Richard III Educational Resources Dr Jo Appleby from the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology and Ancient History describes the injuries visible on the skeleton found beneath a council car park in September 2012 which was subsequently identified as the remains of King Richard III. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed by Carl Vivian Edited by Hayley Evans
Richard III - Identifying the Remains
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii - Richard III Educational Resources Dr Turi King from the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics and Dr Jo Appleby from the University's School of Archaeology and Ancient History discuss the scientific processes and techniques which will be applied to the skeleton found under a council car park in September 2012, techniques which will subsequently confirm the remains as those of King Richard III. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Views: 203645 University of Leicester
Neurological Examination of the Limbs - Demonstration
 
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A second more detailed video can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam/limbs This is a real-time demonstration illustrating technique and patient interaction involved in the Neurological Examination of the Limbs. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Peter Critchley MD FRCP Consultant Neurologist. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 1104128 University of Leicester
Running an Agarose Gel - University of Leicester
 
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A short film showing the procedures involved in the production and running of an agarose gel. The film was produced by GENIE, based within the Genetics Department at the University of Leicester. Further information and materials can be found on the GENIE web site http://www.le.ac.uk/ge/genie/ and the GENIE VGEC web site http://www.le.ac.uk/ge/genie/vgec/ The film was directed by Jon Shears of ITS-Multimedia Services and the film was produced by Raymond Dagleish, Nicola Suter-Giorgini and Cas Kramer.
Views: 116914 University of Leicester
Making an Agarose Gel - University of Leicester
 
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A short film showing the procedures involved in the production of an agarose gel. It is part one of a two part video. The second part of the film "Running an Agarose Gel" can also be found on the University of Leicester YouTube Channel. The film was produced by GENIE, based within the Genetics Department at the University of Leicester. Further information and materials can be found on the GENIE web site http://www.le.ac.uk/ge/genie/ and the GENIE VGEC web site http://www.le.ac.uk/ge/genie/vgec/ The film was directed by Jon Shears of ITS-Multimedia Services and the film was produced by Raymond Dagleish, Nicola Suter-Giorgini and Cas Kramer.
Views: 102507 University of Leicester
Cardiovascular Examination - Demonstration
 
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A second more detailed video can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam/cardiovascular This is a real-time demonstration illustrating technique and patient interaction involved in the Cardiovascular Examination. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Adrian Stanley PhD FRCP Consultant in Cardiovascular Medicine. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 229197 University of Leicester
Paediatric Clinical Examinations - The Abdomen
 
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This is a real-time demonstration illustrating the technique and parent and child interaction involved in the examination of the abdominal system of a child. The film was produced by a paediatrician to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts where the history has been taken, and the clinical examination is about to commence. Written and presented by Dr Elaine Carter, Emeritus Consultant Paediatrician, MA, MB ChB, MRCP, FRCPCH, MMedSci. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Written & Produced by Elaine Carter
Views: 145183 University of Leicester
Alison Balsom - Allegro, from Concerto in D for Trumpet and Organ by J S Bach
 
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http://alisonbalsom.com/ Alison Balsom performing Allegro, from Concerto in D for Trumpet and Organ by J S Bach, [after Vivaldi’s Violin Concerto in D] at the University of Leicester Degree congregation on 17th July 2015. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Edited by Carl Vivian
Views: 314145 University of Leicester
Opening the Medieval Stone Coffin Found at the Richard III Burial Site
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/ University of Leicester Archaeologists open the mysterious lead coffin found buried just feet from the former grave of King Richard III. The coffin was discovered in in August 2013 – one year after the remains of the former King of England were unearthed. Inside the lead coffin, archaeologists found the skeleton of an elderly woman, who academics believe could have been an early benefactor of the friary – as radiocarbon dating shows she might have been buried not long after the church was completed in 1250 (although analysis shows her death could have taken place as late as 1400). The high status female was in one of 10 graves discovered in the grounds of the medieval complex, including that of Richard III, six of which were left undisturbed. Those that were examined were all found to have female remains. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Views: 652793 University of Leicester
Richard III – The DNA Analysis & Conclusion
 
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Dr Turi King and Professor Kevin Schϋrer discuss the findings of the genetic and genealogical analysis in the King Richard III case. This includes coverage of all the genealogical research, and the results of the mitochondrial and Y chromosome analysis. It also includes the genetically-predicted hair and eye colour of Richard III as well as the results of the Bayesian analysis of all the evidence in the case to come to a conclusion about the identity of Skeleton 1 from the Greyfriars in Leicester. The producers of the clip wish to express their grateful thanks to the Royal Collection Trust, Society of Antiquaries of London, Michael Ibsen, Wendy Duldig, Anooshka Rawden and John Holt. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Turi King and Professor Kevin Schϋrer.
Respiratory Examination - Explanation
 
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This is a detailed explanation of the Respiratory Examination illustrating technique and patient interaction. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Jonathan Bennett MD FRCP Consultant Respiratory Physician. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 225841 University of Leicester
Paediatric Clinical Examinations - The Respiratory System
 
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This is a real-time demonstration illustrating the technique and parent and child interaction involved in the examination of the respiratory system of a child. The film was produced by a paediatrician to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts where the history has been taken, and the clinical examination is about to commence. Written and presented by Dr Elaine Carter, Emeritus Consultant Paediatrician, MA, MB ChB, MRCP, FRCPCH, MMedSci. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Written & Produced by Elaine Carter
Richard III and the Break in the Male Line
 
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Dr Turi King and Professor Kevin Schϋrer discuss the findings of Y chromosome analysis in the King Richard III case and the theoretical consequences of the results. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Turi King and Professor Kevin Schϋrer.
How to wear a Toga - Dr Mary Harlow - University of Leicester
 
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https://le.ac.uk/history-and-archaeology Dr Mary Harlow, Associate Professor of Ancient History at the University of Leicester, describes how a Roman Citizen would have put on and worn their Toga. Dr Harlow's research interests focuses on dress in action: in understanding the varied source material (archaeological textiles, iconography, literary and documentary writing) to build a picture of the effect of dress as worn. She is interested in how dress is used to display status, gender, age, ethnicity and identity generally, and how that identity is negotiated through the Roman social system. This clip was produced by Strategic Marketing and Communications at the University of Leicester to support the outreach programme of the School of Archaeology and Ancient History. We are working in partnership with Classics for All to champion Classics in schools (https://classicsforall.org.uk/regional-hubs/leicester/). Further resources for teaching ancient Rome can be found at: https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/archaeology/outreach/teaching-resources Costume made by Christine Labrom Filmed, Edited and Stills Photography by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Mary Harlow, Jane Ainsworth and Dr Sarah Colley
Cardiovascular Examination - Explanation
 
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This is a detailed explanation of the Cardiovascular Examination illustrating technique and patient interaction. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Adrian Stanley PhD FRCP Consultant in Cardiovascular Medicine. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 203810 University of Leicester
The Life Cycle of Yeast - Professor Rhona Borts
 
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Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is a unicellular organism used in baking and brewing. In this short film, Professor Rhona Borts from the Dept of Genetics at the University of Leicester (UK) explains the life cycle of yeast. This film is part of a collection of resources on the use of model organisms in medical research produced by Dr Chris Willmott and Professor Andrew Fry of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Leicester. Funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research council and the GENIE Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, these videos show how the use of invertebrate species such as yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) can be applicable to human medicine. Professor Rhona Borts http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/people/borts BBSRC http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/ GENIE http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/genie BioethicsBytes http://bioethicsbytes.wordpress.com/
Beagle 2 Found on Mars
 
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The UK-led Beagle 2 was due to land on Mars on 25 December 2003. The spacecraft was ejected from Mars Express on 19 December 2003. Nothing had been heard from Beagle 2 and the mission was presumed lost. Until now. It has now been announced that the Mars Lander has been identified partially deployed on the surface of Mars by images taken by the HiRISE camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). These images show potential targets on the surface of Mars for the lander and key entry and descent components within the expected landing area. Following analysis by members of the Beagle 2 team, which includes Leicester scientists, and NASA, the images show the Beagle 2 lander in what appears to be a partially deployed configuration with the main parachute and what is thought to be the rear cover close by. Several interpretations of the image of the lander have been identified, consistent with the lander’s size and shape and changes in light reflections suggest that the object is metallic – again consistent with Beagle 2. Professor Colin Pillinger from the Open University, who died in May 2014, led the Beagle 2 project along with colleagues from our Department of Physics and Astronomy. Another major contributor, Professor George Fraser and Director of the Space Research Centre at the University, also passed away in 2014. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Ellen Rudge
Views: 380011 University of Leicester
Richard III - The Archaeological Dig
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii - Richard III Educational Resources Project manager Richard Buckley from University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) discusses the 'Greyfriars Project', the excavation in August 2012 of a council car park which unearthed a skeleton subsequently identified as the mortal remains of King Richard III. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Views: 168342 University of Leicester
The Planeterrella - Polar Light Simulation
 
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Dr Gabrielle Provan of the University of Leicester Physics & Astronomy department demonstrates how Aurora Borealis (or the Northern Lights) are created. Using a Planeterrella designed by CNRS scientist Jean Lilensten she recreates Kristian Birkeland's 100+ year old experiment. Showing how charged particles within solar winds coming from our Sun collide with atoms in the Earth's atmosphere to create a natural light display. For more information about the Planeterrella see; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/physics/outreach/planeterrella For more information about CNRS see; http://planeterrella.osug.fr/spip.php?article95 This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Gabrielle Provan
Respiratory Examination - Demonstration
 
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A second more detailed video can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam/respiratory This is a real-time demonstration illustrating technique and patient interaction involved in the Respiratory Examination. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Jonathan Bennett MD FRCP Consultant Respiratory Physician. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 136298 University of Leicester
Welcome to the University of Leicester
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/ Welcome to the University of Leicester. In this video you will hear from 3 members of the University community. We want you to enjoy your experience here and get involved with everything from day one! We hope you find your time with us successful and enjoyable – good luck as you take your first steps to becoming a Leicester graduate! This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Any private student information in this film produced for performance purposes only, and is not real. Filmed & Edited by Hayley Evans Produced by Marie Muir This film was shot in 2016 so always check the University of Leicester webpages for latest information and up-to-date terms and conditions www.le.ac.uk
UCAS Application - The Personal Statement
 
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The personal statement is a vital part of your UCAS application form and is your opportunity to tell universities and colleges about your suitability for the course(s) that you hope to study. You need to demonstrate your enthusiasm and commitment, and above all, ensure that you stand out from the crowd. In this short video, Sam Winter, an Outreach Officer for the University of Leicester explains what admissions Tutor's are looking for and points out a few common pitfalls that should be avoided. You can also hear top tips for filling out your personal statement from five of our admissions tutors in this video: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=ANCjt23EZZw For more information about the University of Leicester: http://www2.le.ac.uk/ For more information about applying through UCAS see: http://www2.le.ac.uk/study/ugp/applying http://www.ucas.com/students/ New personal statement video can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANCjt23EZZw This film was produced in 2012 by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Presented by Sam Winter
Careers after Biological Sciences - James
 
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Dr. James Lonnen is the Commercial Laboratory Director in the Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation at the University of Leicester. He studied Biological Sciences (Microbiology), one of a suite of Biological Sciences degrees available at the University of Leicester, and graduated in 2000. In this short video James talks about his career path since completing his original degree and offers some advice to undergraduate students. Since 2000 James has spent 2 years in a technical sales job for the water treatment company Nalco. He has spent a year as research technician at the University of Leicester and completed a PhD in Molecular Biology, also at the University of Leicester. His current post involves disinfectant and drug efficacy testing against microorganisms, in particular the testing of contact lens disinfecting solutions against bacteria, fungi, virus and Acanthamoeba according to ISO 14729. Also, the isolation and identification of pathogenic free-living amoeba and bacteria from water, environmental and clinical samples. For more information about Dr James Lonnen and the University of Leicester Commercial Amoebae Laboratory see http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/iii/research/amoeba This video is part of the Careers After Biological Sciences at Leicester initiative (CABS). Started in 2007, CABS aims to demonstrate the variety of careers that can be pursued after completion of a degree in the biosciences. For more information about Careers After Biological Sciences see http://biosciencecareers.wordpress.com/ For more information about studying Biological Sciences at the University of Leicester see http://www.le.ac.uk/bs/ This film was produced by Marketing and Student Recruitment, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Chris Willmott This film was shot in 2010 so always check the University of Leicester webpages for latest information and up-to-date terms and conditions https://le.ac.uk/
Using a Scanning Electron Microscope
 
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An instructional video aimed at third year undergraduates and above, in the basics of scanning electron microscopy. The film is a training aid, which the student is required to watch prior to hands on training. Thereafter, it serves as an aid to use of the equipment. The video was written and produced by Katy McKenzie from the Department of Chemistry, Simon Lawes and David Weston from the Department of Engineering at the University of Leicester. For more information about Chemistry at Leicester see; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/chemistry For more information about Engineering at the University of Leicester see; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/engineering This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Richard III - Uncovering the Church of the Friars Minor Leicester
 
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In the summer of 2013 University of Leicester Archaeological Services returned to the Greyfriars site where they found the remains of Richard III. A second dig at the site was necessary because Leicester City Council were about to start work on the King Richard III Visitor Centre, part of which would cover the archaeological site. The second dig gave the archaeologists the chance to explore a much wider area than the 2012 dig and also gave opportunities to exhume further human remains from the site. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Examination of the Cranial Nerves - Explanation
 
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This is a detailed explanation of the examination of the Cranial Nerves illustrating technique and patient interaction. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Richard Abbott MD FRCP Consultant Neurologist. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 430418 University of Leicester
Abdominal Examination - Explanation
 
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A second video can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam/abdominal This is a detailed explanation of the abdominal examination illustrating technique and patient interaction. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Mr Adam Scott MS FRCS (Edin) FRCS (Eng) Consultant General and Colorectal Surgeon. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 243805 University of Leicester
Richard III - The Blue Boar Inn
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii - Richard III Educational Resources The Blue Boar Inn was medieval Leicester's 'Grand Hotel' and is believed to be where King Richard III stayed the night before the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. With the aid of detailed drawings, produced shortly before the Blue Boar was demolished, Richard Buckley has overseen a project to produce a detailed scale model of the building. The Blue Boar Inn is believed to have been built in the mid-15th century on Medieval Leicester's High Street -- now Highcross Street. It was a large and elaborately decorated building, which would have housed wealthy aristocrats and merchants as they travelled through the country. In the 1830s, the Inn was demolished - and until now, the only evidence for what it looked like consisted of a pair of engravings made by Leicestershire artist John Flower in 1826. Richard Buckley came across new evidence when looking through the notebooks of 19th century architect Henry Goddard -- a member of important Leicestershire architectural dynasty the Goddard family. One notebook contained extensive notes and measurements of a large timber frame building which Richard immediately recognised as the Blue Boar Inn. Richard asked Steffan Davies, an architect with experience in historic building drawings, if he could put together computer-aided design (CAD) drawings of the building based on Henry Goddard's plans. Steffan agreed, and put together a series of drawings as well as a 3-D computer model. This was then passed to the University of Leicester Department of Physics and Astronomy and converted into a scale model using the Department's 3D printer. The model shows all the timber framing, the jointing, the moulding of the timbers, the fireplaces and the chamber in which Richard III was said to have stayed. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Jon Lord - Honorary Degree - University of Leicester
 
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A short clip of Jon Lord receiving and responding to the presentation of the Honorary Degree (Doctor of Music) from the University of Leicester. Jon Lord was born in Leicester in 1941 and was educated at Wyggeston Grammar School for Boys, right next door to the University of Leicester. Moving to London at 19, he started performing with jazz bands and rhythm and blues groups, acquiring his first electric organ in 1963. In 1968 Jon Lord co-founded Deep Purple and during his eight years with the band, his Hammond organ riffs underpinned many great songs including the classic 'Smoke on the Water'. He also took the band in a classical direction by composing a major work, 'Concerto for Group and Orchestra', first performed in 1969 with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Malcolm Arnold. After a brief spell as one third of Paice, Ashton and Lord, he played with Whitesnake between 1978 and 1984 then rejoined a new line-up of Deep Purple where he stayed until retiring in 2002 to concentrate on solo work. Throughout his career in rock, Jon Lord has continued a parallel career in classical music, recording and performing his own compositions. The last time Jon Lord visited the University of Leicester was 41 years ago when Deep Purple played at the Students' Union on 7 February 1970.
Ionic Liquids
 
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A short film explaining what Ionic Liquids are and how they are used. The film is silent and was produced for the Department of Chemistry at the University of Leicester, to be used as a background loop playing DVD at University Open Days. Ionic Liquids are part of the research interests of Professor Andrew Abbott in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Leicester and in his words they are "Magic Potions for a Greener Environment". Further details about the Chemistry Department at the University of Leicester can be found at: http://www.le.ac.uk/chemistry/ http://www.le.ac.uk/chemistry/staff/apa1.html Ionic Liquids are now produced and distributed by SCIONIX a University of Leicester spin out company. Details about SCIONIX can be found at: http://www.scionix.co.uk/
The Arched Framed Portrait of Richard III - Society of Antiquaries of London
 
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Dr Turi King from the University of Leicester Gentetics Department and Anooshka Rawden from the Society of Antiquaries of London discuss the Arched Framed portrait of Richard III. The Arched Framed portrait of Richard III is hanging in the Meeting Room of the Society of Antiquaries of London. http://www.sal.org.uk/ This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Turi King and Professor Kevin Schϋrer.
Basic Life Support On A Child
 
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Kim Hammond a senior clinical skills facilitator at Leicester Royal Infirmary demonstrates how to perform basic life support on a child in a hospital environment. The video includes a real time demonstration which is then repeated with explanations of what is being done and why. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Kim Hammond
Dr Suzie Imber - Astronauts: Do you have what it takes?
 
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https://le.ac.uk/physics Dr Suzie Imber, from the University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, is a step closer to becoming an astronaut after being crowned the winner of the six-part BBC series. Dr Imber fought off tough competition from 11 other exceptional candidates, chosen from thousands who applied, including scientists, engineers and pilots, to receive the ultimate reference – Chris Hadfield’s backing for her application when the space agency ESA next take on astronaut recruits. As part of the programme, the candidates were put through a series of gruelling tests to find out who had the special qualities needed to be an astronaut using standards set by the world’s space agencies. They were assessed by astronaut and former Commander of the International Space Station, Chris Hadfield, along with former NASA medical researcher Dr Kevin Fong, and psychologist Dr Iya Whiteley. During the series, the candidates had remarkable access to astronaut training facilities around the world including the state-of-the-art German Space Centre, a secret facility in Sweden and NASA’s Kennedy Space Centre in Florida. Suzie is an associate professor of Planetary Science and a graduate of the University of Leicester, having studied for her PhD in the Department of Physics and Astronomy under the supervision of Professor Steve Milan. She has held posts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre and the University of Michigan, and is currently involved in instrument design and operation for ESA’s next mission to Mercury. Suzie was an international lacrosse player in earlier years, and is also an elite rower and a highly-experienced mountaineer. She has written computer code to identify and map unclimbed peaks in the Andes and Himalayas before setting off to climb them herself, completing several first ascents. Suzie has been interested in space from a young age, and has spent her academic career looking at our solar system – her current research looks at terrestrial space weather and Mercury’s magnetosphere. This film was produced by Marketing and Student Recruitment, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Ellen Rudge
Accommodation at the University of Leicester
 
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Set in a residential location, adjacent to the Botanical Gardens and University Sports Facilities, the Oadby Student Village is one of the most impressive student accommodation sites in the UK. The village is a mixture of properties, from Edwardian houses to our newest purpose-built accommodation blocks. These three sites are very popular with undergraduates, especially those just beginning their university career. High levels of pastoral care are provided to reflect the younger population. There are three sites at the Oadby Student Village 1) John Foster Hall, our newest and largest Hall. 2) Gilbert Murray and Stamford, a mix of catered and self-catered residences in ensuite, standard and shared rooms. 3) Beaumont and Digby Hall, situated in the University Botanical Gardens. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian This film was shot in 2011 so always check the University of Leicester Accommodation webpages for latest information and up-to-date terms and conditions https://le.ac.uk/student-life/postgraduates/accommodation
Richard III - The Genealogy
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii - Richard III Educational Resources Professor Kevin Schürer, the University of Leicester's Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Enterprise, discusses how direct descendants of King Richard III's family were traced, whose DNA could then be used to identify the remains found under a council car park in September 2012 as those of the King. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed by Carl Vivian Edited by Hayley Evans
Anna Louise Parker Hand Carving the Lettering onto Richard III's Oak Coffin
 
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http://www.annalouiseparker.co/ Anna Louise Parker is a lettering artist and sculptor with her own studio in North London. She was asked by Michael Ibsen if she’d be able to add lettering and detail to the lid of Richard III's coffin. In this short clip Anna hand carves the lettering directly onto the oak coffin lid. http://www.annalouiseparker.co/ This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
Forensic Archaeology at the University of Leicester
 
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www.le.ac.uk http://www2.le.ac.uk/centres/forensic-science In this film Dr Richard Thomas, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at the School of Ancient History and Archaeology, talks about his research and teaching, with a focus on Forensic Archaeology. At the University of Leicester, Forensic Archaeology is taught as a final-year option to students on single, and joint-honours archaeology programmes. A distance-learning module in Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology will be launched in 2013 for students on the BA Archaeology (by distance learning) and a Forensic Science and Criminal Justice MSc (distance learning course) will be underway in 2012. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Hayley Evans This film was shot in 2012 so always check the University of Leicester webpages for latest information and up-to-date terms and conditions www.le.ac.uk
The Moment Archaeologist Mathew Morris Found Richard III's Remains
 
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Archaeologist Mathew Morris finds a human left leg bone at the edge of trench one on the first day of the dig at the Greyfriars site. Careful examination reveals a parallel right leg, indicating an undisturbed grave. The remains (Skeleton One) are covered to protect them from the weather until more is known about where they are located within the friary. Eleven days later on 5th September 2012 Skeleton One was exhumed and was a youngish male, with evidence of battle trauma and a severe curvature of the spine. On the 4th February 2013 ‘Skeleton One’ from the Greyfriars Archaeological dig was confirmed as the remains of King Richard III. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian
A Complete Guide to Hand Washing
 
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This is a short film showing how to wash your hands correctly with both Alcohol Rub and Soap and Water within a medical environment. Doing this correctly is an important first step in infection control within all medical establishments. This clip was originally used by Medical Students at the University of Leicester as part of a larger teaching package.
Views: 356163 University of Leicester
The Jennifer Aniston Neuron & Forming Memories
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/ http://www.le.ac.uk/csn Brain scientists in the UK and US have collaborated to make ‘a spectacular discovery’ - for the first time in human studies - of how memories are formed and new learning takes place. A collaboration between Dr Matias Ison and Professor Rodrigo Quian Quiroga at the Centre for Systems Neuroscience University of Leicester, and Dr Itzhak Fried at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center revealed how a neuron in the brain instantly fired differently when a new memory was formed. The research group at Leicester and UCLA had previously announced the ‘Jennifer Aniston neuron’ –the firing of a single neuron for a single image to form a concept. The team has now proved their hypothesis to be true- and has gone further to demonstrate how new memories are formed. The scientists showed patients images of a person in a context e.g. Jennifer Aniston at the Eiffel Tower, Clint Eastwood in front of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, Halle Berry at the Sidney Opera House or Tiger Woods at the White House. They found that the neuron that formerly fired for a single image e.g. Jennifer Aniston or Halle Berry, now also fired for the associated image too i.e. the Eiffel Tower or Sidney Opera House. “The remarkable result was that the neurons changed their firing properties at the exact moment the subjects formed the new memories - the neuron initially firing to Jennifer Aniston started firing to the Eiffel Tower at the time the subject started remembering this association,” said Rodrigo Quian Quiroga, head of the Centre for Systems Neuroscience at the University of Leicester. “Moreover, we observed these changes after just a single presentation. This is a radical departure from previous experiments in animals where changes have been observed mainly after long training sessions. This is critical to understanding the neural processes underlying real-life memory formation, as in real life we are not repeatedly exposed to an event in order to remember it - just one exposure is enough.” The researchers from the University of Leicester and Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center have published their research in the peer-reviewed leading journal Neuron. The research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Medical Research Council (MRC), the Human Frontiers Science Program and the Mathers Foundation. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed by Hayley Evans Edited by Amy Cory
Richard III - The Scientific Outcome
 
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http://www.le.ac.uk/richardiii - Richard III Educational Resources On the 4th February 2013 the University of Leicester announced it had discovered the remains of King Richard III. During this live recording the researchers put forward the evidence and present their conclusions. This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Filmed by Hayley Evans & Carl Vivian Edited by Carl Vivian
The Power of Comparative Genomics
 
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Genomics is a branch of genetics in which large stretches of DNA, ideally the entire chromosome(s) of an organism are studied. As the complete series of DNA letters (bases) in the genomes of a growing number of organisms are worked out, it becomes possible to analyse these sequences side-by-side to look for similarities and differences. This method, known as genomics, can be a very powerful way to reveal information about the relationship between different species. It can also have surprising uses in medical research. In an example discussed in the video, a team led by Susan Dutcher from Washington University were able to find a previously unknown gene causing a human disease by comparing the human genome with the DNA of two different plant species. If you want to know how, watch the film! Comparative genomics can help to reduce the number of experiments being carried out with more complex species, such as mammals. Use of this approach is therefore making a valuable contribution to scientists' commitment to the 3Rs (the desire to reduce, refine and replace the use of higher animals in research). This film is part of a collection of resources on the use of model organisms in medical research produced by Dr Chris Willmott and Professor Andrew Fry of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Leicester. Credits: This video was part-funded by grants from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Genetics Education Networking for Innovation and Excellence (GENIE). Acknowledgements: Cover shot from Nature 15th February 2001 reproduced with permission from Nature Publishing Group. Cover shot from Science 16th February 2001 reproduced with permission from AAAS and Ann Cutting (artist) Footage of normal and defective cilia kindly provided by Prof Chris O'Callaghan Li et al. (2004) Comparative Genomics Identifies a Flagellar and Basal Body Proteome that Includes the BBS5 Human Disease Gene, Cell, Vol. 117, Pages 541-552. Copyright Cell Press 2004 This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Written and Produced by Andrew Fry and Chris Willmott Filmed and Edited by Carl Vivian Animation by David Wickins Narrated by Jon Shears For further information about; BBSRC: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/ GENIE: http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/genie BioethicsBytes: http://bioethicsbytes.wordpress.com/
Model Organisms in Biomedical Research
 
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Research to understand the working of the human body and to develop new medicines frequently involves the use of other species in preliminary experiments. For both ethical and economic reasons, scientists are committed -- as far as is possible -- to refining, reducing and replacing the use of higher animals in research. Using lower species, for example fruit flies and even yeast, as model organisms is an important part of that commitment.This film is part of a collection of resources on the use of model organisms in medical research produced by Dr Chris Willmott and Professor Andrew Fry of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Leicester. Credits:This video was part-funded by grants from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Genetics Education Networking for Innovation and Excellence (GENIE). This film was produced by External Relations, University of Leicester. Written and Produced by Andrew Fry and Chris Willmott Filmed and Edited by Carl Vivian Animation by David Wickins Narrated by Jon Shears For further information about; BBSRChttp://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/ GENIEhttp://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/genetics/genie BioethicsByteshttp://bioethicsbytes.wordpress.com/
Tightropes & Safety Nets - Counselling Suicidal Clients
 
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Counselling a client who is suicidal can be one of the most demanding and professionally challenging experiences for any counsellor. Balancing the needs and rights of the client against professional expectations and an appropriate management of confidentiality can be extremely difficult. Regardless of setting or client group, counsellors are likely to work with suicidal clients at some point in their career. This video is a short extract from a 63 minute DVD aimed at Counsellors. The DVD is titled "Tightropes & Safety Nets - Counselling Suicidal Clients" and has been produced and directed by the Institute of Lifelong Learning, University of Leicester - Professor Sue Wheeler, Dr. Andrew Reeves from University of Liverpool Counselling Service and Jon Shears, University of Leicester Multimedia Services. The DVD that the clip comes from can be used either by individual counsellors who wish to explore their own personal and professional responses to suicide risk, or by training groups to prompt thought and debate around these difficult and sensitive issues. The vignettes presented in the DVD are drawn from casework, and developed in response to counselor feedback to help ensure they capture important professional dilemmas. The DVD has four main menus: Perspectives on Suicide; Talking about Suicide with a Client; Assessing Suicide Risk; The Counsellors Process. Menu One: Perspectives on Suicide This section is divided into two parts. Part one provides an insight into an individuals experience of having been suicidal, and what they experienced as helpful and unhelpful at that time. Part two provides an insight into three counsellors experiences of working with suicidal clients; how suicide risk might present in sessions, responses to suicidal clients and the demands of being a counsellor when faced with this professional challenge. Menu Two: Talking About Suicide with a Client Research suggests that how we talk about suicide with our clients can profoundly shape both our understanding of their suicidal experience, and our ability to assess risk (Reeves et al., 2004). Additionally, the counsellors willingness to talk about suicide will either facilitate the clients potential to understand their own suicidal thoughts and therefore their capacity to support themselves through crisis, or hinder it. A counsellors session with their client Kieran demonstrates how important counsellor interventions are with suicidal clients. Menu Three: Assessing Suicide Risk Current approaches to suicide risk assessment emphasize the importance of understanding risk factors. Such factors might include age, gender and employment status for example. While some counsellors routinely include the use of risk assessment tools in their work with clients, (e.g. through questionnaires etc.), many do not. Counsellors need to be able to identify risk factors in their work with clients to help inform their assessment of suicide risk. A counsellors work with Josh and Anne demonstrates how suicide risk factors can be identified during a counselling session. Menu Four: The Counsellors Process An under researched aspect of working with suicidal clients is the influence of the counsellors own response to suicide potential. How counsellors hear suicidal thoughts, how they feel and what they think or believe will all significantly influence the therapeutic dialogue. Additionally, counsellors responses will not only shape the nature of what is talked about, but also potentially influence decisions such as whether to seek specialist assessment, or even whether to continue with counselling. Counsellor responses to their client work can be understood well through their use of supervision. Five supervision vignettes are presented, demonstrating five different ways in which counselors might be affected by their work with suicidal clients. For more information about Counselling courses at the University of Leicester see; http://www.le.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/counselling/courses/index.html The "Tightropes Safety Nets - Counselling Suicidal Clients" DVD is available now, see http://www.go.le.ac.uk/tightropes
Neurological Examination of the Limbs - Explanation
 
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This is a detailed explanation of the Neurological Examination of the Limbs illustrating technique and patient interaction. The film was produced by practising clinicians to aid the teaching of clinical examination skills. It starts at the point when the clinician has finished taking the medical history and begins the clinical examination. Presented by Dr Peter Critchley MD FRCP Consultant Neurologist. Produced and Directed by Dr Irene Peat FRCR FRCP, Dr Nicholas Port MBChB BSc and Jon Shears. More Clinical Examination materials can be found at; http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/msce/existing/clinical-exam
Views: 534887 University of Leicester
University of Leicester - School of Museum Studies
 
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www.le.ac.uk Over the past 50 years the University of Leicester has acquired a global reputation for its leading-edge thinking and experimental practice both in the field of museum studies and amongst cultural institutions of all types. Today, the School of Museum Studies is a place where researchers, practitioners and postgraduate students from around the world come together to think creatively and critically about museums, galleries and heritage; to explore and investigate, to experiment and create, to question and debate. In 2016, the School of Museum Studies celebrates its 50th anniversary. Founded in 1966, the School remains the only UK university department dedicated to the study of museums and galleries. At the very cutting edge of teaching and research in its field, the School is engaged in partnerships throughout the world, offers a range of postgraduate courses and hosts a large and diverse PhD research community. This film was produced by Marketing and Student Recruitment, University of Leicester. Filmed and Edited by Hayley Evans Produced by Suzanne MacLeod This film was shot in 2015 so always check the University of Leicester webpages for latest information and up-to-date terms and conditions www.le.ac.uk
Careers After Biological Sciences - Shiraz
 
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Shiraz Makda is a Foundation Year One Doctor. He studied Medical Biochemistry, one of a suite of Biological Sciences degrees available at the University of Leicester, before pursuing a five year Medicine programme also at the University of Leicester. In this short video Shiraz talks about his experiences since completing his original degree and offers some advice to people thinking of following a similar route into postgraduate medicine. This video is part of the Careers After Biological Sciences at Leicester initiative (CABS). Started in 2007, CABS aims to demonstrate the variety of careers that can be pursued after completion of a degree in the biosciences. For more information about Careers After Biological Sciences see http://biosciencecareers.wordpress.com/ for more information about studying Biological Sciences at the University of Leicester see http://www.le.ac.uk/bs/ and for more information about the University of Leicester see http://www.le.ac.uk This film was produced by Marketing and Student Recruitment, University of Leicester. Filmed & Edited by Carl Vivian Produced by Dr Chris Willmott This film was shot in 2009 so always check the University of Leicester webpages for latest information and up-to-date terms and conditions https://le.ac.uk/
The Bone Marrow Aspiration
 
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A short film showing the Bone Marrow Aspiration procedure. The video was produced for the use of Medical Students at the University of Leicester. It was written and produced by Doctor Sue Pavord, Consultant Haematologist and Lecturer at the University of Leicester Medical School. This video comes with a warning that it is of a medical nature and is quite graphic in places. It starts with an explanation of the most common sites used for obtaining Bone Marrow samples by needle aspiration, before moving on to show the anaesthetic being administered and a Bone Marrow specimen being obtained. The video concludes with an example of a Core Biopsy being taken with a Trephine Needle.
Views: 496269 University of Leicester

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