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Clifford Geertz: The Interpretation of Cultures (The Balinese Cockfight)
 
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The anthropologist Clifford Geertz's influential method for the interpretation of other cultures was what we termed 'thick description'. In this video, I take an introduction to Geertz's thought and look at his seminal essay - Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight. Then & Now is FAN-FUNDED! Support me on Patreon and pledge as little as $1 per video: http://patreon.com/user?u=3517018 Or send me a one-off tip of any amount and help me make more videos: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=JJ76W4CZ2A8J2 Buy on Amazon through this link to support the channel: https://amzn.to/2ykJe6L Follow me on: Facebook: http://fb.me/thethenandnow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thethenandnow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lewlewwaller Sources: Ed. By, J. Alexander, P. Smith, M. Norton, Interpreting Clifford Geertz: Cultural Investigation in the Social Sciences C. Geertz, The Interpretation of Cultures T.H. Eriksen, Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology Credits: Stock footage provided by Videvo, downloaded from https://www.videvo.net
Views: 829 Then & Now
What is THICK DESCRIPTION? What does THICK DESCRIPTION mean? THICK DESCRIPTION meaning & explanation
 
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What is THICK DESCRIPTION? What does THICK DESCRIPTION mean? THICK DESCRIPTION meaning - THICK DESCRIPTION definition - THICK DESCRIPTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In the fields of anthropology, sociology, religious studies, and human and organizational development, a thick description of a human behavior is one that explains not just the behavior, but its context as well, such that the behavior becomes meaningful to an outsider. The term was introduced by the 20th century philosopher Gilbert Ryle and later developed by anthropologist Clifford Geertz in his The Interpretation of Cultures (1973) to describe his own method of doing ethnography (Geertz 1973:5-6, 9-10). Since then, the term and the methodology it represents has gained currency in the social sciences and beyond. Today, "thick description" is used in a variety of fields, including the type of literary criticism known as New Historicism. In his essay "Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture" (1973), Geertz explains that he adopted the term from philosopher Gilbert Ryle, specifically his lecture "What is le Penseur doing?" Geertz's "thick description" approach has become increasingly recognized as a method of symbolic anthropology, enlisted as a working antidote to overly technocratic, mechanistic means of understanding cultures, organizations, and historical settings. Influenced by Gilbert Ryle, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Max Weber, Paul Ricoeur, and Alfred Schutz, the method of descriptive ethnography that came to be associated with Geertz is credited with resuscitating field research from an endeavor of ongoing objectification—the focus of research being "out there"—to a more immediate undertaking, where participant observation embeds the researcher in the enactment of the settings being reported. Geertz is revered for his pioneering field methods and clear, accessible prose writing style. He was considered "for three decades...the single most influential cultural anthropologist in the United States." He served until his death as professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.
Views: 6449 The Audiopedia
Full interview with Clifford Geertz - part one
 
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First part of the full interview of the anthropologist Clifford Geertz, filmed in May 2004 in Cambridge. For a downloadable, higher quality, version with a summary, please see 'Interviews' on www.alanmacfarlane.com All revenue is donated to: http://www.oralliterature.org/
Thick Description
 
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This video is about Thick Description
Views: 7026 Leslie Rech
geertz clifford the interpretation of cultures selected essays
 
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Get 15% Promo code: https://goo.gl/B1GmVw?52922
Symbolic Meaning of Culture
 
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Subject:Media and communication studies Paper: Media, culture and society
Views: 111 Vidya-mitra
Thick description
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) In the fields of anthropology, sociology, religious studies, and human and organizational development, a thick description of a human behavior is one that explains not just the behavior, but its context as well, such that the behavior becomes meaningful to an outsider.The term was introduced by the 20th century philosopher Gilbert Ryle and later developed by anthropologist Clifford Geertz in his The Interpretation of Cultures to describe his own method of doing ethnography .Since then, the term and the methodology it represents has gained currency in the social sciences and beyond.Today, "thick description" is used in a variety of fields, including the type of literary criticism known as New Historicism. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 1902 WikiWikiup
Geertz--models of and for (Interpretive Anthropology)
 
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I'm Dr. Nicholas Herriman, anthropology lecturer at La Trobe Uni. This is part of It comes from my subject Symbols & Society http://anthropologyofsymbols.blogspot.com.au/2017/06/introduction.html. This presentation is an introduction to Geertz's idea of symbols as 'models of' and 'models for'. Geertz combines a theory of religion with a theory of symbols. By way of background, if you're interested in his theory of religion, you can watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpgAtylzMQE&list=PLhfpovIUddBx6d7mz6MSjOKQu6VINNvmG&index=23&t=16s. Thank you for your comments and questions regarding the image I use around 16:00. By way of response, the book I used was from days studying Fine Arts as an undergrad. The image is Turner's, Fire at the Tower of London. Don't know how I forgot that!
Views: 4780 Nicholas Herriman
10f Seven Classic Theories of Religion - Clifford Geertz
 
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Part six in a screencast lecture in six parts on seven classic theories of religion. This part covers the work of anthropologist Clifford Geertz. http://tinyurl.com/religionsclass Screencast lectures by Dr. Dale Tuggy, for his INDS 120 World Religions - a college course surveying the traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and introducing students to the terms and classic theories of Religious Studies. You can take this course for credit during July 2014. See: http://www.fredonia.edu/summer/ It counts as a GenEd World Civilizations course for SUNY schools, and may count for various requirements in Religious Studies or general education at your school (contact your Registrar's office if you're unsure). This series is being created Feb - June 2014, so more screencasts are coming each week.
Views: 8221 khanpadawan
Full interview with Clifford Geertz part one
 
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First part of the full interview of the anthropologist Clifford Geertz, filmed in May 2004 in Cambridge. For a downloadable, higher quality, version with a summary, . Second part of the full interview of the anthropologist Clifford Geertz, filmed in May 2004 in Cambridge. For a downloadable, higher quality, version with a . An interview with the anthropologist Clifford Geertz. For full interview or interviews of many others, please see: .
Views: 511 Gokhan Avni
Structure of Myth (Levi-Strauss)--Symbols & Society
 
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I'm Dr Nick Herriman. This presentation is part of my subject Symbols & Society: http://anthropologyofsymbols.blogspot.com.au/2017/11/5-symbols-thought-structures-levi.html Read my books: Entangled State, www.yale.edu/seas/EntangledState.htm.
Views: 6830 Nicholas Herriman
Cultural Approach
 
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Views: 4065 Trang Phan
Cultural Studies - Cliford Geertz 2
 
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A presentation of Clifford Geertz's thick description by me and my colleagues - 4.11.2008, Culturology, Sofia University.
Views: 3071 Elnahir
Religion: Clifford Geertz
 
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In diesem Film wird anhand des Schulbuchs Evangelisch verstehen der Religionsbegriff von Clifford Geertz erläutert. Geertz ist es gelungen, eine -wenn auch komplizierten- äußerst leistungsfähige Definition des Begriffs Religion vorzulegen, die sowohl die Subjektivität jeder Religiosität anerkennnt, gleichzeitig aber offenlegt, warum aus der Perspektive des religiösen Subjekts ein "Mehr" dahinter steckt.
Views: 655 Dr. Karsten Jung
What is CULTURAL TURN? What does CULTURAL TURN mean? CULTURAL TURN meaning & explanation
 
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What is CULTURAL TURN? What does CULTURAL TURN mean? CULTURAL TURN meaning - CULTURAL TURN definition - CULTURAL TURN explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The cultural turn is a movement beginning in the early 1970s among scholars in the humanities and social sciences to make culture the focus of contemporary debates; it also describes a shift in emphasis toward meaning and away from a positivist epistemology. The cultural turn is described in 2005 by Lynette Spillman and Mark D. Jacobs as "one of the most influential trends in the humanities and social sciences in the last generation." A prominent historiographer argues that the cultural turn involved a “wide array of new theoretical impulses coming from fields formerly peripheral to the social sciences,” especially post-structuralism, cultural studies, literary criticism, and various forms of linguistic analysis, which emphasized “the causal and socially constitutive role of cultural processes and systems of signification.” The cultural turn in the late 20th century is interpreted as referring to either a substantive shift in society or an analytical shift in academia. The former argues that culture plays a more significant role in advanced societies, which fits with the notion of post-modernity as an historical era in which people "emphasizes the importance of art and culture for education, moral growth, and social criticism and change." The latter is movement within academia to place the concept of culture, and the related notions of meaning, cognition, affect, and symbols at the center of methodological and theoretical focus. Some argue that the analytical shift is endogenous to the substantive shift. Culture can be defined as, “the social process whereby people communicate meanings, make sense of their world, construct their identities, and define their beliefs and values.” Or, for Georg Simmel, culture refers to "the cultivation of individuals through the agency of external forms which have been objectified in the course of history". Thus culture can be interpreted on a spectrum from purely individualistic solipsism to objective forms of social organization and interaction. One of the earliest works in which the term "cultural turn" showed up was Jeffrey C. Alexander's chapter "The New Theoretical Movement" in Neil Smelser's Handbook of Sociology (1988). Alexander, rightly pointed out that the origins of the cultural turn should be traced in the debate of idealism and materialism i.e Marx and Hegel. Prior to the labeling of the movement, in the 1970s, “foundational works underlying and facilitating the turn to cultural forms of analysis” emerged: Hayden White’s Metahistory: The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Europe (1973), Clifford Geertz’s The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays (1973), Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish (1977), and Pierre Bourdieu’s Outline of a Theory of Practice (1977). While the earlier twentieth century experienced a linguistic turn, mostly brought about by the thought of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Ferdinand de Saussure, the cultural turn of the late twentieth century absorbs those criticisms and adds on.
Views: 1772 The Audiopedia
TFA interpretation of cultures
 
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School project English class
Views: 132 Rianne ;-;
Symbolic and Interpretative Anthropology (ANT)
 
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Subject:Anthropology Paper:Theories and methods in social cultural anthropology
Views: 2988 Vidya-mitra
Remembering Clifford Geertz - Part I
 
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Clifford Geertz, an eminent scholar in the field of cultural anthropology known for his extensive research in Indonesia and Morocco, died on October 30, 2006, at the age of 80. Geertz was Professor Emeritus in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, where he had served on the Faculty since 1970. Geertz's appointment was significant not only for the distinguished leadership it would bring to the Institute, but also because it marked the initiation of the School of Social Science, which in 1973 formally became the fourth School at the Institute. On March 3, 2007, Remembering Clifford Geertz, an event celebrating Geertz's life and work, was held in Wolfensohn Hall on the Institute's campus. It featured a series of talks and Javanese music performed by Gamelan Kusuma Laras under the direction of I.M. Harjito. The program may be viewed by clicking here. For additional information about Geertz and the nature and impact of his influential research, please see the Winter 2007 issue of The Institute Letter. More videos on http://video.ias.edu
Clifford Geertz
 
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Clifford James Geertz (August 23, 1926 – October 30, 2006) was an American anthropologist who is remembered mostly for his strong support for and influence on the practice of symbolic anthropology, and who was considered "for three decades...the single most influential cultural anthropologist in the United States." He served until his death as professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 4475 Audiopedia
What is SYMBOLIC CULTURE? What does SYMBOLIC CULTURE mean? SYMBOLIC CULTURE meaning & explanation
 
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What is SYMBOLIC CULTURE? What does SYMBOLIC CULTURE mean? SYMBOLIC CULTURE meaning - SYMBOLIC CULTURE definition SYMBOLIC CULTURE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Symbolic culture is the ability to learn and transmit behavioural traditions from one generation to the next by the invention of things that exist entirely in the symbolic realm. Symbolic culture is the cultural realm constructed and inhabited uniquely by Homo sapiens and is differentiated from ordinary culture, which many other animals possess. Symbolic culture is studied by archaeologists, social anthropologists and sociologists. Examples are concepts such as good and evil, mythical inventions such as gods and underworlds, and social constructs such as promises and football games. Symbolic culture is a domain of objective facts whose existence depends, paradoxically, on collective belief. A currency system, for example, exists only for as long as people continue to have faith in it. When confidence in monetary facts collapses, the facts themselves suddenly disappear. Much the same applies to citizenship, government, marriage and many other things that people in our own culture consider to be 'real'. The concept of symbolic culture draws from semiotics, and emphasises the way in which distinctively human culture is mediated through signs and concepts. The symbolic aspect of distinctively human culture has been emphasised in anthropology by Emile Durkheim, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Clifford Geertz and many others. From a Darwinian standpoint, symbolic culture has proved hard to explain. One difficulty is that the concept itself often seems unsettling and philosophically unacceptable to natural scientists. Modern science became established in opposition to the idea that culturally accepted fictions can be equated with facts. Yet the concept of symbolic culture requires us to grasp just that paradoxical possibility. Long before the late twentieth century invention of the Internet, evolution allowed humans to flit between two realms, reality on the one hand, virtual reality on the other. Symbolic culture is an environment of virtual entities lacking counterparts in the real world. It was once thought that art and symbolic culture first emerged in Europe some 40,000 years ago, during the Middle-to-Upper Palaeolithic transition – often termed the 'symbolic explosion' or 'Upper Palaeolithic revolution'. Some archaeologists still adhere to this view. Others now accept that symbolic culture probably emerged in sub-Saharan Africa at a much earlier date, during the period known as the Middle Stone Age. The evidence consists of traditions of ground ochre with strong selection for the colour red, examples of so-called ochre 'crayons' which appear to have been used for purposes of design, probably on the body, and geometric engravings on blocks of ochre. All this apparently formed part of a cosmetics industry dated to between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago. One theory is that this constitutes evidence for a ritual tradition. In addition, from about 100,000 years ago, we have pierced shells which appear to show signs of wear, suggesting that they were strung together to make necklaces. If the ochre tradition has been correctly interpreted, it constitutes evidence for the world's first 'art' - an aspect of 'symbolic culture' - in the form of personal ornamentation and body-painting. It was initially countered that pigment-only decorative systems are merely individualistic display, not necessarily indicative of ritual, whereas the bead traditions testify to language, institutionalised relationships and full-scale ritual and symbolic culture. More recently, however, those making this criticism have conceded that the evidence for ochre pigment use, stretching back towards 300,000 years ago, must indeed be recognised as the earliest durable media testifying to a collective ritual tradition.
Views: 1773 The Audiopedia
Cultural Studies - Cliford Geertz 1
 
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A presentation of Clifford Geertz's thick description by me and my colleagues - 4.11.2008, Culturology, Sofia University.
Views: 5090 Elnahir
Thin vs thick description
 
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What makes shoes "designey"? - with David Harrison @welearn @CISE
Views: 216 Ecoope EU
Clifford Geertz
 
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Obras y antropología social
Views: 11813 madelein torres
Understanding Religion as Social Context: Weber and Geertz
 
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An introduction to the theories of religion of Max Weber and Clifford Geertz.
Views: 4377 Grant Potts
Interview with Clifford Geertz
 
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An interview with the anthropologist Clifford Geertz. For full interview or interviews of many others, please see: http://www.alanmacfarlane.com/ancestors/audiovisual.html All revenue is donated to: http://www.oralliterature.org/
What are Hermeneutics?
 
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What are Hermeneutics? Hermeneutics may sound like a complicated term or theory but it really isn't. Let me explain. Hermeneutics comes from the Greek word "hermeneuo" which means "to interpret." Hermeneutics is a method of text interpretation based on changes in the world. Preconceptions can affect our interpretation of what is being communicated through a text. We live in a special time period with a unique culture. Over time, people change, and so does the world and the ways we interpret things. Different time periods have a different culture and will interpret texts differently. If interpretation is based on present culture rather than the culture of author of the text, the interpretation will be different from the author's original intent. We can read recently published books without hermeneutics because it is in our time period and culture. If we were to read a book published thousands of years ago like the Bible, we need hermeneutics to understand the context and have a proper interpretation. In short, good hermeneutics leads to good interpretation while bad hermeneutics leads to bad interpretation. Here's an example. Let's say you film a documentary of your daily life and put it in a box. A thousand years later someone discoveries it and watches the documentary. Obviously, the person watching it will understand it in a completely different way than intended. The person is in a totally different time period and culture. For example, the words spoken in the video may have changed meanings over the past time. Different time periods have different expressions. Proper hermeneutics and interpretation comes from taking in the context of the culture and time period the text was written in. To properly interpret ancient texts, we need to take into consideration the cultural and historical context. Only then can we figure out the author's original intent.
Views: 35993 Pichael Moon
Notes On "Notes on the Balinese Cockfight"
 
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In one of my classes we had to read "Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight" by Clifford Geertz, and make a visual response to it. Jesus, was it ever colonialist. Also I fucked up saying "playwright" oh well.
Views: 3757 emmacan
Religion as a Cultural System by Clifford Geertz
 
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Video by Risa Ristiana Pictures Sources: 1. Wikipedia 2.https://ristantosumarsono.blogspot.co.id/2012/11/tour-de-walisongo-masjid-demak-yang.html?m=1 3. http://budisetianto.blogspot.co.id/2009/03/ziarah-sunan-muria.html?m=1
Remembering Clifford Geertz - Part II
 
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Clifford Geertz, an eminent scholar in the field of cultural anthropology known for his extensive research in Indonesia and Morocco, died on October 30, 2006, at the age of 80. Geertz was Professor Emeritus in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, where he had served on the Faculty since 1970. Geertz's appointment was significant not only for the distinguished leadership it would bring to the Institute, but also because it marked the initiation of the School of Social Science, which in 1973 formally became the fourth School at the Institute. On March 3, 2007, Remembering Clifford Geertz, an event celebrating Geertz's life and work, was held in Wolfensohn Hall on the Institute's campus. It featured a series of talks and Javanese music performed by Gamelan Kusuma Laras under the direction of I.M. Harjito. The program may be viewed by clicking here. For additional information about Geertz and the nature and impact of his influential research, please see the Winter 2007 issue of The Institute Letter. More videos on http://video.ias.edu
TOP 20 Clifford Geertz Quotes
 
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TOP 20 Clifford Geertz Quotes. Wallpapers - https://quotefancy.com/clifford-geertz-quotes “Man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun.” — Clifford Geertz (00:00) “I think of myself as a writer who happens to be doing his writing as an anthropologist.” — Clifford Geertz (00:07) “People keep asking how anthropology is different from sociology, and everybody gets nervous.” — Clifford Geertz (00:14) “We don’t know what we think until we see what we say.” — Clifford Geertz (00:21) “I’ve often been accused of making anthropology into literature, but anthropology is also field research. Writing is central to it.” — Clifford Geertz (00:28) “Culture is public, because meaning is.” — Clifford Geertz (00:35) “I don’t write drafts. I write from the beginning to the end, and when it’s finished, it’s done.” — Clifford Geertz (00:42) “Anthropology never has had a distinct subject matter, and because it doesn’t have a real method, there’s a great deal of anxiety over what it is.” — Clifford Geertz (00:49) “I don’t think things are moving toward an omega point; I think they’re moving toward more diversity.” — Clifford Geertz (00:56) “I don’t feel that an atmosphere of debate and total disagreement and argument is such a bad thing. It makes for a vital and alive field.” — Clifford Geertz (01:03) “I think what’s known about neurology is still scattered and uncertain.” — Clifford Geertz (01:10) “If I remember correctly, a writer is someone who wants to convey information. Language or writing is a code.” — Clifford Geertz (01:17) “Meaning is socially, historically, and rhetorically constructed.” — Clifford Geertz (01:24) “Believing, with Max Weber, that man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun, I take culture to be those webs, and the analysis of it to be therefore not an experimental science in search of law but an interpretive one in search of meaning.” — Clifford Geertz (01:31) “I think the perception of there being a deep gulf between science and the humanities is false.” — Clifford Geertz (01:38) “Has feminism made us all more conscious? I think it has. Feminist critiques of anthropological masculine bias have been quite important, and they have increased my sensitivity to that kind of issue.” — Clifford Geertz (01:45) “One of the most significant facts about humanity may finally be that we all begin with the natural equipment to a live a thousand kinds of life but end in the end having lived only one.” — Clifford Geertz (01:52) “If we wanted home truths, we should have stayed at home.” — Clifford Geertz (01:59) “I had a hard time convincing students that they were going to North Africa to understand the North Africans, not to understand themselves.” — Clifford Geertz (02:06) “My instincts are always against people who want to fasten some sort of hegemony onto things.” — Clifford Geertz (02:13) Music credit: Easy Day - Kevin MacLeod
Views: 47 Quotefancy
Week 5 Clifford Geertz Anti Anti-Relativism
 
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Week 5 Supplemental Clifford Geertz Anti Anti-Relativism
Views: 2451 Soc Pol
Religion: 25 Concepts in Anthropology
 
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A preview of the concept of "religion" as used by Geertz. I define "religion" here not as "belief in the supernatural" but rather as "beliefs and actions associated with what is 'really real'". Geertz combines a theory of religion with a theory of symbols. By way of background, if you're interested in his theory of symbols, you can watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxaDv2dCACI I took part in a radio program on the issue of religion a few years after recording this presentation: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/earshot/the-accidental-atheist/7889880 Corrections: I said "the crux of what it is to be human"; this is incorrect. I meant "an example of what it is to be human". Early morning, difficult topic: apologies... Sources used: * Stanner, WEH 1972, 'The Dreaming', in WA Lessa & E Vogt (eds), Reader in Comparative Religion: An Anthropological Approach, Harper and Row, New York, pp. 269-272. (A classic and easy-to-understand work) * Munn, ND 1970, 'The Transformations of Subjects into Objects in Walbiri and Pitjantjatjara Myth', in RD Berndt (ed.), Australian Aboriginal Anthropology: Modern Studies in the Social Anthropology of the Australian Aborigines, Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies & University of Western Australia Press, pp. 141-163. (Profound but excruciatingly difficult) * Atkinson, JM 1987, 'The Effectiveness of Shamans in an Indonesian Ritual', American Anthropologist, vol. 89, no. 2, pp. 342-355. (Fascinating, and a good example of what contemporary anthropological research 'looks like') *Beatty, A 2009, A Shadow Falls in the Heart of Java, Faber and Faber, London. (A great read) *Geertz, C 1966, 'Religion as a Cultural System', in M Banton (ed.), Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Religion, Tavistock Publications, London, pp. 1-46. (Another classic: hard-going but rewarding) About me: I'm Nick Herriman, author of The Entangled State and Witch-hunt and Conspiracy. In the "25 Concepts in Anthropology" series, I preview what I think are the 25 most important concepts in socio-cultural anthropology. Each concept provides a unique insight into what it is to be human. I am also the 'Audible Anthropologist' on iTunes.
Views: 6711 Nicholas Herriman
What is LINGUISTIC EMPATHY? What does LINGUISTIC EMPATHY mean? LINGUISTIC EMPATHY meaning
 
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What is LINGUISTIC EMPATHY? What does LINGUISTIC EMPATHY mean? LINGUISTIC EMPATHY meaning - LINGUISTIC EMPATHY definition - LINGUISTIC EMPATHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Culture consists of both material culture and non-material culture. Thoughts or ideas that make up a culture are called the non-material culture. In contrast to material culture, non-material culture does not include any physical objects or artifacts. Examples of non-material culture include any ideas, beliefs, values, norms that may help shape society. Language is one way humans are able to communicate, making it possible for people to share thoughts and opinions with one another. This type of communication impacts the formation of culture.There can exist variations in one language within sub-cultural groups. Language and culture are closely tied together and can affect one another. One example of culture shaping language is the case of the Piraha people. Their lack of words for numbers makes it impossible for them to have complex mathematical systems in their culture. This could be a result of their cultural requirements: because they have no need for extensive mathematics, there would be no need for them to form number words. The formation of American slang can also serve as a reflection of culture and has changed as American culture developed. For example, as people began speaking out in defense of homosexuality in the 1960s, vulgar language and slang became more acceptable to use and began to be included in dictionaries. The theory based on the works of Edward Sapir and Benjamin Lee Whorf holds that language actually limits and shapes how people see the world around them. This theory of linguistic relativity would indicate that language alters and restricts the formation of language. In his 1973 book, The Interpretation of Cultures, anthropologist Clifford Geertz refers to culture as "a system of inherited conceptions expressed in symbolic forms by means of which men communicate, perpetuate, and develop their knowledge about and attitudes toward life," expressing the importance he placed on symbols in culture. Just like language, symbols form as a culture grows. People in a particular society attribute meaning to specific objects, and that imbued meaning transforms that object into a widely recognized symbol in that society. There can be symbols that cross cultural boundaries. For example, a cross is a universal symbol of Christianity, and is so universally known due to the prevalence of Christianity in different cultures. Though the first stop sign first appeared in Michigan in the United States, the physical attributes are so well known in many different cultures due to its use in so many different countries. Some symbols meaning only to a particular cultures. In American culture, a white picket fence is a widely recognized symbol for a successful and happy suburban life. The culture that an individual is part of influences several aspects of that individual, including behavior. Through socialization, an individual will learn the values and norms inherent in their society and, in most cases, will behave according to those values and norms. Behavior is important because it can convey the values of a society. For example, in Japanese culture, which depends on the "fundamental relatedness of individuals" it is important to fit in with those around you and maintain harmonious personal relationships. Individuals in Japanese culture behave to avoid exclusion from society, putting flexibility, empathy, and self-restraint above expression of personal thoughts and opinions. Behavior can also have an impact on a culture. This can be seen in the caste system in India. In higher caste levels, it is customary for an individual to follow Sanskritic customs. Those in the lower caste levels take on this behavior in order to move up in the caste system. This type of behavior has had an influence on Indian culture: the numerous amounts of lower caste individuals participating in Sanskritic customs helped spread those customs all throughout India.
Views: 71 The Audiopedia
Clifford Geertz in Morocco
 
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Views: 33 Jeniver
Defining Religion Through Parody: Applying Geertz's Definition of Religion to the Church of Helix
 
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Showing how Clifford Geertz's definition of religion is highlighted by the construction of the "parody" religion, the "Church of Helix", by Twitch Plays Pokemon. YouTube Videos used: LORE -- Twitch Plays Pokemon Lore in a Minute! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwBZ0im-w0E Fall of the Void on r/place- Attack on Helix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0s4yPnY6PM
Views: 95 Steven Hoover
Clifford Geertz
 
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Views: 46 Ximena De Velasco
Traditional & Rational: 25 Concepts in Anthropology
 
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A preview of the concepts of "traditional" and "rational" as used by anthropologists. Important concepts include: 1. Traditional Action (action determined by longstanding habits, i.e. the way our parents and their parents did it)--e.g. eating food at table, building a mosque from memory, butchering a chicken for a ritual. 2. Affectual / Emotional Action (action determined by strong feelings)--e.g. I kill a chicken because I am angry with it. 3. Wertrational Action (action with scientific means to achieve intrinsic values)--e.g. making a cake with $8 worth of ingredients, rather than buying it for $5. 4. Zweckrational Action (action with scientific means & scientific goals)--e.g. buying a cake for $5 rather than making it; killing chickens using statistics etc.; Rationalization; disenchantment; iron cage; modernity; base, structure, superstructure. Relevant reading includes: Aron, Raymond. 1967 Main Currents in Sociological Thought 2. Harmondsworth: Penguin. See pp. 186-187. Geertz, Clifford. 1973 "Internal Conversion" in Contemporary Bali. In The Interpretation of Cultures: Selected Essays by Clifford Geertz. C. Geertz, ed. Pp. 170-89. London: Hutchinson. Hefner, Robert. 1987 The Political Economy of Islamic Conversion in Modern East Java. In Islam and the Political Economy of Meaning: Comparative Studies in Muslim Discourse. W.R. Roff, ed. London: Croon Helm. Weber, Max. 1991 The Social Psychology of the World Religions. In From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology. H. H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills, eds. Great Britain: Routledge. About me: I'm Nick Herriman, author of The Entangled State and Witch-hunt and Conspiracy. In the "25 Concepts in Anthropology" series, I preview what I think are the 25 most important concepts in socio-cultural anthropology. Each concept provides a unique insight into what it is to be human. I am also the 'Audible Anthropologist' on iTunesU.
Views: 1097 Nicholas Herriman
Symbolic anthropology
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Symbolic anthropology or, more broadly, symbolic and interpretive anthropology, is the study of cultural symbols and how those symbols can be interpreted to better understand a particular society.It is often viewed in contrast to cultural materialism.According to Clifford Geertz, "elieving, with Max Weber, that man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun, I take culture to be those webs, and the analysis of it to be therefore not an experimental science in search of law but an interpretive one in search of meaning." Prominent symbolic anthropologists include Clifford Geertz, David Schneider, Victor Turner and Mary Douglas. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
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