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How to interpret clinical trial data – Examples from recent clinical trials
 
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Presented by S. Wassmann This is a webcast of the ESC Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy “All About Clinical Trials” course recorded during December 2017 live course in Vienna. The course aims at improving the professional knowledge and skills required to plan and deliver successful cardiovascular pharmacotherapy clinical trials.
Clinical interpretation and validity of clinical trials: When do they become practice changing?
 
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In this presentation from the ESMO 20th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Dr. Alberto Sobrero discusses when the interpretation and validity of clinical trials become practice changing for physicians.
Views: 446 ImedexCME
Know the Basics  Understanding Clinical Trials
 
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Learn how you can play a role in research through clinical trials. This program discusses informed consent, types of trials, and phases of a trial. This program was offered in partnership with ResearchMatch and the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America. Watch and fill out this survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/webinar630
HEMATOLOGY; INTERPRETING BLOOD TESTS by Professor Fink
 
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Professor Fink identifies many of the most common Blood Tests run and describes how this data is interpreted and used to diagnose the condition of the patient. Reference is made to both Blood Chemistry and Hematology (Blood Cells), including electrolytes, enzymes, the Lipid Panel, Complete Blood Cell Count (CBC), Differential WBC Count and assessment of T-4 (Thyroxin) and TSH (Thyrotropin). Check-out professor fink's web-site for additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: www.professorfink.com Down-loadable e-Books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink can be purchased at: https://wlac.redshelf.com/ “Hard Copy” Lecture Outlines can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: http://onlinestore.wlac.edu/fink.asp
Views: 31474 professorfink
How to Appraise a Clinical Trial - Part 1
 
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An overview of how to read and critically evaluate a clinical trial, prior to applying the information to your patient. Included is a discussion of the importance of randomization, controls, blinding, allocation concealment, proper sample size, and more.
Views: 8648 Strong Medicine
How to Interpret and Use a Relative Risk and an Odds Ratio
 
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RR and OR are commonly used measures of association in observational studies. In this video I will discuss how to interpret them and how to apply them to patient care
Views: 215667 Terry Shaneyfelt
Ophthalmic Clinical Skills - Topic 4b - Interpretation of fields
 
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Ophthalmic Clinical Skills - Topic 4b - , Ophthalmic Clinical Skills, Optometry, SCHS City University London
Views: 35136 CityHealthLearning
Clinical Laboratory Tests: Which, Why, and What do the Results Mean?
 
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Dr. Alex Alexander; Week 2, FA2013 - Bastyr University Naturopathic Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis Portion of Lecture Course (Based on Article Referenced Below) Reference: Wians, F.H., (2009) Clinical Laboratory Tests:Which, Why, and What Do The Results Mean?, Lab Medicine, 40;2.
Views: 53416 5psnapod
Introduction to lab values and normal ranges | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Find out how health professionals use short-hand for labs and the meaning of normal ranges. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/lab-values/v/what-s-inside-of-blood?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/infectious-diseases/malaria/v/preventing-malaria?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 399954 khanacademymedicine
Interpreting meta-analyses and clinical trials: can we believe the data? - G. Savarese
 
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This presentation focuses on important study design/statistical issues that needs to be considered for the interpretation of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses results.
How to Interpret a Forest Plot
 
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This video will discuss how to interpret the information contained in a typical forest plot.
Views: 175274 Terry Shaneyfelt
Kidney Disease: Understanding Your Lab Values
 
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Tracking and understanding your laboratory values is essential. In this video, kidney expert, Danuta Trzebinska, MD, shares important laboratory values to monitor your chronic kidney disease. Learn more about kidney disease treatment at UC San Diego Health: http://health.ucsd.edu/nephrology.
Views: 73298 UC San Diego Health
Interpretation of the Urinalysis (Part 1) - Introduction and Inspection
 
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An overview of the components of a UA, along with discussion of urine color and turbidity.
Views: 169098 Strong Medicine
Interpreting a forest plot of a meta-analysis
 
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This video explains how to interpret data presented in a forest plot. Described by David Slawson, MD, Professor, University of Virginia. From the Making Decisions Better: The Information Mastery Curriculum and Assessment Program, an evidence-based medicine teaching program from Clinical Information Sciences, http://ClinicalInformationSciences.com.
Future of Clinical Data and Medical Device Regulation 2017/745
 
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For questions about this topic, please contact [email protected] This presentation provides an overview of the new requirements of Medical Device Regulation 2017/745 as well as of the MEDDEV 2.7/1 Rev. 4 regarding clinical evaluations. Sandra Bugler, M.Sc. provides insights into the conduction of a clinical evaluation. Learn about the: Interpretation of new requirements Structure of clinical evaluation reports Challenges regarding equivalent devices Clinical data for class III and implantable devices Post-Market Clinical Follow-up
Views: 1398 NSF International
Interpreting Blood Tests (Part 1) - Simply Finals 2016
 
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PLEASE NOTE - This was recorded in 2016. For the latest version of this talk, please visit our website: www.simplyrevision.org.uk Lecture given by Dr Andrew Smith. In Part 1 of this lecture, I discuss the FBC and U+Es. Simply Finals is a free medical revision course. For lecture slides, please visit www.simplyrevision.org.uk. Don't forget to like us on Facebook.
Views: 19752 Simply Finals
How to interpret a survival plot
 
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This short video describes how to interpret a survival plot. Please post any comments or questions below, or at our Statistics for Citizen Scientists group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/421599921510833/?ref=bookmarks
Views: 20803 Darren Dahly
Confidence Interval Interpretation. 95% Confidence Interval 90% 99%
 
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CORRECTION: Although my mistake is beyond the scope of the Step 1 exam, the interpretation of Confidence Interval that I used in the video is incorrect & a bit oversimplified. I stated that for an individual study there is a 95% chance that the true value lies within the 95% CI. However, confidence interval is a type of frequentist inference and the interpretation I gave in the video is really better suited for interpreting statistics of Bayesian Inference (Again please don’t feel like you need to know these terms for the exam). What I should have said is something like “if 100 similarly designed studies use a 95% confidence interval then 95 of these intervals will contain the true value and 5 will not. For more info on this misconception click here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayesian_inference A Confidence Interval (CI) is the range of values the true value in the population is expected to fall within based on the study results. The results we receive in any study do not perfectly mirror the overall population and the confidence interval lets us get a better idea of what the results in the overall population might be. The confidence interval is based on a certain level of confidence. Don't get this confused with the value of the sample population. If the measured BMI in 100 people in your study population and the mean is 25 than you are very confident that the actual mean BMI in that group is 25. Confidence interval only comes into play when you try to extrapolate your study results to other situations (like to the population overall). If you have a 95% confidence interval (which is most common) that means there is a 95% chance that the true value lies somewhere in the confidence interval. You can also alter the width of the confidence interval by selecting a different percentage of confidence. 90% & 99% are also commonly used. A 99% confidence interval is wider (has more values) than a 95% confidence interval & 90% confidence interval is the most narrow. The width of the CI changes with changes in sample size. The width of the confidence interval is larger with small sample sizes. You don't have enough data to get a clear picture of what is going on so your range of possible values is wider. Imagine your study on a group of 10 individuals shows an average shoe size of 9. If based on the results you are 95% sure that the actual average shoe size for the entire population is somewhere in between 6 and 12, then the 95% CI is 6-12. Based just on your results you don't really know what the average in the population is, because your study population is a very small sliver of the overall population. Now if you repeat the study with 10,000 individuals and you get an average shoe size of 9 the confidence interval is going to be smaller (something like 8.8 to 9.3). Here you have a much larger sample size and therefore your results give you a much clearer idea of what is going on with the entire population. Therefore, your 95% CI shrinks. The width of the confidence interval decreases with an increasing sample size (n). This is sort of like the standard deviation decreasing with an increased sample size. Confidence intervals are often applied to RR & OR. For example, the odds ratio might be 1.2, but you aren't sure how much of an impact chance had on determining that value. Therefore, instead of just reporting the value of 1.2 you also report a range of values where the true value in the population is likely to lie. So we would report something like the odds ratio is 1.2 and we are 95% confident that the true value within the overall population is somewhere between .9 and 1.5. You can use the confidence interval to determine statistical significance similar to how you use the p-Value. If the 95% confidence interval crosses the line of no difference that is the same things as saying there is a p-value of greater than 5%. This is intuitive because if the confidence interval includes the value of no difference then there is a reasonable chance that there is no difference between the groups. If the confidence interval does not cross the line of no difference than the observed difference is statistically significant, because you know it is highly unlikely that the two groups are the same. For both relative risk (RR) and odds ratio (OR), the "line of no difference" is 1. So an RR or OR of 1 means there is no difference between the two groups being compared with respect to what you are measuring. This is because RR and OR are ratios and a value divided by itself is 1. If the 95% confidence interval of the RR or OR includes the value 1, that means it is possible the true value is 1 and there is no difference between groups. If that is the case, we say the null hypothesis cannot be rejected or that there is no statistically significant difference shown. This is the same thing as saying the p-value is greater than .05.
Views: 220769 Stomp On Step 1
IPPCR 2015: Overview of Clinical Study Design
 
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IPPCR 2015: Overview of Clinical Study Design Air date: Tuesday, October 20, 2015, 5:00:00 PM Category: IPPCR Runtime: 01:29:48 Description: The Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research (IPPCR) is a course to train participants on how to effectively conduct clinical research. The course focuses on the spectrum of clinical research and the research process by highlighting epidemiologic methods, study design, protocol preparation, patient monitoring, quality assurance, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues. For more information go to https://ippcr.nihtraining.com/login.php Author: Laura Lee Johnson, Ph.D., FDA Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19257
Views: 19059 nihvcast
Meta analysis - learn how to interpret - quickly
 
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All you need to know about how to interpret the results of a meta analysis in 14 minutes and 15 seconds. If you find yourself in an exam and asked to review a meta analysis in an interview or an exam, or even if you're reading one in a journal to inform your clinical practice, this will be the best 1/4 hour you have spent in ages. If you want a more detailed explanation and to properly understand the process, then download our other podcast about meta analysis, which gives the background to all you see here. With Brett Doleman and Jon Lund
Views: 13888 school of surgery
Evidence Based Clinical Practice - Bias and data interpretation
 
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This channel is designed to assist students undertaking the Year 4C MBBS Evidence Based Clinical Practice (EBCP) program.
Views: 684 Year4EBCP
MPG Primer: Clinical interpretation of genes for disease causality, Part 1 (2018)
 
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January 11th, 2018 MPG Primer Broad Institute Clinical interpretation of genes for causality and of sequence variants for pathogenicity; Part 1/2 Heidi Rehm, PhD, FACMG Brigham and Women's Hospital; Harvard Medical School; The Broad Institute Clinical interpretation of genes for disease causality The Primer on Medical and Population Genetics is a series of informal weekly discussions of basic genetics topics that relate to human populations and disease. Experts from across the Broad Institute community give in-depth introductions to the basic principles of complex trait genetics, including human genetic variation, genotyping, DNA sequencing methods, statistics, data analysis, and more. Videos of these sessions are made freely available for viewing here and are geared toward a wide audience that includes research technicians, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and established investigators just entering the field. For more information, please visit: -Program in Medical Population Genetics (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/224/) -Primer videos (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/1339/) Copyright Broad Institute, 2018. All rights reserved.
Views: 1547 Broad Institute
Clinical Research Statistics for Non-Statisticians
 
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Through real-world examples, webinar participants learn strategies for choosing appropriate outcome measures, methods for analysis and randomization, and sample sizes as well as tips for collecting the right data to answer your scientific questions.
Views: 10421 RhoInc1984
Module 05 - Clinical trials in the EU
 
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Moderator: Fergus Sweeney, EMA - Clinical trials authorisation in the EU: present and future - Transparency on clinical trials information in the EU
Views: 1570 emainfo
How to use population frequency data in variant interpretation process
 
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How to use population frequency data in variant interpretation process: an overview of the Exome Aggregation Consortium dataset Video created by: the NSGC Cardiovascular and Personalized Medicine SIGs
MPG Primer: Clinical interpretation of sequence variants (2017)
 
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This event was originally live streamed to YouTube on January 5th, 2017. Clinical interpretation of sequence variants Heidi Rehm Broad Institute; Harvard Medical School; Brigham and Women's hospital The Primer on Medical and Population Genetics is a series of informal weekly discussions of basic genetics topics that relate to human populations and disease. Experts from across the Broad Institute community give in-depth introductions to the basic principles of complex trait genetics, including human genetic variation, genotyping, DNA sequencing methods, statistics, data analysis, and more. Videos of these sessions are made freely available for viewing here and are geared toward a wide audience that includes research technicians, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and established investigators just entering the field. For more information, please visit: -Program in Medical Population Genetics (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/224/) -Primer videos (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/1339/) Copyright Broad Institute, 2017. All rights reserved.
Views: 3336 Broad Institute
Missing data in clinical trials: making the best of what we haven’t got
 
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Missing data in clinical trials: making the best of what we haven’t got Speaker: Michael O’Kelly (Principal Scientific Advisor, IQVIA) Researchers in the last twenty years have come up with a snowstorm of ideas about how to interpret the results of clinical trials that have missing data. Michael O’Kelly summarises the landscape of ideas as he and his colleagues found it. A key change was the move from trying to “handle” missing data, to realising that missing data should be included in our understanding of clinical trial results. We can try to include missing data in our results by coarsening the outcome so as to include the missingness itself as part of that outcome; or by qualifying any estimate of treatment effect with sensitivity analyses; or by modelling some kind of counterfactual so as to attempt causal inference on a stratum of interest such as subjects who would have had no missing data. There are strong objections to each of these options, and the arguments continue. Michael will describe how in his own company, IQVIA, local Missing Data Superusers have improved the understanding of the issue of missing data, and also notes the strong co-operation in industry and academia in sharing methodologies for missing data. Current publicly available resources for statisticians will be summarised. Finally, Michael will talk about three key points: preventing missing data in clinical trials; how evidence from previous clinical trials can help give confidence in results when there is missing data; and the importance of clinical interpretability of results from trials with missing data.
Views: 250 RoyalStatSoc
Examples from clinical trials - S. Wassmann
 
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This workshop uses data from recent clinical trials to highlight important aspects to correctly interpret clinical trial data, including the design, study population and endpoints of a clinical trial, superiority versus non-inferiority analyses, intention-to-treat versus on-treatment analyses, subgroup analyses, and the value of meta-analyses.
Personalized Chemotherapy: Understanding Clinical Trials - the Kaplan Meier Graph
 
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In this episode of Personalized Cancer Chemotherapy Dr. Weisenthal explains the Kaplan-Meier graph. The graph is often used in clinical trials to compare survival times among patients with the same type of cancer who received different chemotherapy treatments. Understanding the graph is easy and also very useful as it will enable you to cut through the clutter in published clinical trial manuscripts and see at glance if any chemotherapy regimen provided a superior survival benefit.
Views: 31356 WeisenthalCancer
Understanding Confidence Intervals: Statistics Help
 
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This short video gives an explanation of the concept of confidence intervals, with helpful diagrams and examples. Find out more on Statistics Learning Centre: http://statslc.com or to see more of our videos: https://wp.me/p24HeL-u6
Views: 783755 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
MPG Primer: Clinical interpretation of genes for disease causality, Part 2 (2018)
 
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January 11th, 2018 MPG Primer Broad Institute Clinical interpretation of genes for causality and of sequence variants for pathogenicity; Part 2/2 Heidi Rehm, PhD, FACMG Brigham and Women's Hospital; Harvard Medical School; The Broad Institute The Primer on Medical and Population Genetics is a series of informal weekly discussions of basic genetics topics that relate to human populations and disease. Experts from across the Broad Institute community give in-depth introductions to the basic principles of complex trait genetics, including human genetic variation, genotyping, DNA sequencing methods, statistics, data analysis, and more. Videos of these sessions are made freely available for viewing here and are geared toward a wide audience that includes research technicians, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and established investigators just entering the field. For more information, please visit: -Program in Medical Population Genetics (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/224/) -Primer videos (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/1339/) Copyright Broad Institute, 2018. All rights reserved.
Views: 814 Broad Institute
Pulmonary Function Test Interpretation Explained Clearly by MedCram.com
 
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Understand the interpretation of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) step by step with this clear explanation from Dr. Roger Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. This is video 1 of 2 on pulmonary function test interpretation. For a background on PFTs please watch Dr. Seheult's five video series titled "Pulmonary Function Tests Explained Clearly!" http://youtu.be/WyhOJR8btCs Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses - How to Interpret the Results
 
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In this video, I go over how to interpret the results of a meta-analysis.
Views: 49076 Tara Bishop MD
Using Public Access Clinical Databases to Interpret NGS Variants
 
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In this webcast, Gabe Rudy, Vice President of Product Development, will showcase publicly available databases and resources available for interpreting rare and novel mutations in the context of his own personal exome obtained through a limited 23andMe pilot in 2012. The last couple years have seen many changes in well-established resources such as OMIM and dbSNP, while motivating new efforts such as ClinVar and PhenoDB to bring NGS interpretation to clinical grade through a global data sharing effort. In this webcast, Gabe will cover: •The changing landscape of public annotations: Then, Now, and Soon. •Will the new human reference (GRCh38) released in December be a game changer? •Specific examples of improvements in annotation and algorithms that result in more accurate analysis of his own exome. •The utility and progress of NGS to different clinical applications in terms of public resources: carrier screening, hereditary cancer risk, pharmacogenomics, oncology care, and genetic disorder diagnosis. •Sharing of new clinical data: How both variation and phenotype level data is currently being shared and what will be the way forward to match rare and undiagnosed cases at a global scale.
Views: 802 Golden Helix Inc.
Interpreting Hazard Ratios
 
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This video wil help students and clinicians understand how to interpret hazard ratios.
Views: 156891 Terry Shaneyfelt
Lab Interpretation: Finding Clinical Pearls Presented by Filomena Trindade, MD, MPH
 
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This webinar reviews clinical pearls from A4M’s groundbreaking Lab Interpretation workshop that was created to fill gaps in knowledge, and assist practitioners in providing customized care to patients. Laboratory testing of food reactions, digestion and absorption, nutrient status, genomic SNPs, toxicants, cardiovascular health status, and hormones will all be used to explain how testing can aid clinicians in targeting treatments to individualize and customize a patient’s care. Testing can help clinicians move beyond the traditional paradigm of treating symptoms by providing the tools to assess patient status and impairments in biochemical pathways to discover the etiology of the disease. Learning Objectives • What are the essential laboratory tests to utilize in patient care. • How to interpret laboratory results and what are key findings. • How to individualize and customize a patient’s care based on laboratory results. Presented by Filomena Trindade, MD, MPH Filomena Trindade, MD, MPH is an international sought after speaker in functional medicine. She is a graduate of the fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative and Functional Medicine and teaches in the Fellowship (a master's program through the University of South Florida) as well as for the Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM).After obtaining her BA degree in Biology she went on to finish a master's in Public Health in the area of environmental health and epidemiology before starting medical school. She graduated first in her class in family practice from the University of California Davis School of Medicine and did her residency training in family practice at the U.C. San Francisco/Santa Rosa Program. She has been in clinical practice for over 16 years.Before starting her own private practice in 2004 in functional medicine she was the medical director of a non-profit organization that catered to the under-served. She is currently very active in developing teaching programs in Functional Medicine in the USA, Latin America and Europe.
Views: 2278 Genova Diagnostics
MPG Primer:  Clinical interpretation of genes for disease causality (2017)
 
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This Primer was originally live streamed, on February 16th, 2017, by the Broad Institute and features Heidi Rehm. Heidi Rehm, PhD, FACMG Brigham and Women's Hospital; Harvard Medical School; The Broad Institute Clinical interpretation of genes for disease causality The Primer on Medical and Population Genetics is a series of informal weekly discussions of basic genetics topics that relate to human populations and disease. Experts from across the Broad Institute community give in-depth introductions to the basic principles of complex trait genetics, including human genetic variation, genotyping, DNA sequencing methods, statistics, data analysis, and more. Videos of these sessions are made freely available for viewing here and are geared toward a wide audience that includes research technicians, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and established investigators just entering the field. For more information, please visit: -Program in Medical Population Genetics (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/224/) -Primer videos (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/1339/) Copyright Broad Institute, 2017. All rights reserved.
Views: 628 Broad Institute
Data Science in Clinical Research
 
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A PDF of the slides presented can be found here: https://bit.ly/2ILlXx2 Part of the "Biostatistics in Action: Tips for Clinical Researchers" lecture series that is sponsored by the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research - Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design resource, which is supported in part by an NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) through its Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (Grant No, UL1TR001873). The speaker, Jeff Goldsmith, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Mailman School of Public Health. Sponsored by: The Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research: http://irvinginstitute.columbia.edu/ In affiliation with: The Department of Biostatistics at the Mailman School of Public Health: https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/become-student/departments/biostatistics
Views: 225 BERD Education
INFANT-Guardian® - Electronic CTG Interpretation | K2 Medical Systems
 
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K2 INFANT-Guardian® offers intelligent, computerised interpretation of cardiotocograph (CTG) data. Its dynamic algorithm reads and interprets CTG trace at the same level of a human expert and can alert clinicians to problems early, reducing the risk of human error. Please see full details, statistics and benefits at: https://www.k2ms.com/infant-guardian Carefully and precisely developed for over 29 years, K2 INFANT® reads data directly from an electronic fetal monitor (EFM) and assesses the same features an expert would: baseline heart rate, variability, accelerations, decelerations, signal quality, contraction patterns, pushing, sinusoidal and bimodal patterns. When these features become abnormal, they are marked clearly on the trace and escalated along a concern ladder, prompting review from clinicians. Working in conjunction with K2's bedside monitoring program, Guardian™, this data is also transmitted directly to an electronic chalkboard, displayed at the central station. This allows for better visibility and clinical oversight of problems that may occur. Having undergone the largest NHS funded study (47,000 high risk births) the UK has ever seen, INFANT-Guardian has been shown to reduce the poorest outcomes by HALF, against the most comparable study available - The Birthplace Study (BMJ 2011). The INFANT study showed that the incidence of the poorest outcomes (Stillbirths, neonatal deaths and moderate or severe brain damage) was 1.1/1000, compared to 2.57/1000 seen in the Birthplace study. K2 believes, through innovative technology, that reducing human error and preventing avoidable stillbirths and complications during labour is now a tangible reality; one that can save organisations millions in unnecessary litigation. INFANT puts an expert at the bedside, 24 hours a day, creating a lower than low risk environment for high risk births. *INFANT-Guardian® complies with the requirements of the NHS 'Saving Babies' Lives - A Care Bundle for Reducing Stillbirth'.
Views: 767 K2 Medical Systems
Science for all seasons: Medical Interpretation of Human Genomes (2016)
 
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Science for All Seasons: Heidi Rehm Institute Member, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School Medical Interpretation of Human Genomes With the plummeting cost of sequencing, genetic data is becoming increasingly available for use in the diagnosis, treatment and prediction of disease. Ensuring the successful use of genomics in medicine will require the community to come together to share data and contribute to the collective curation of that data for clinical and research use. This talk will focus on national and international efforts to develop improved standards and resources to support genomic medicine. For more information regarding the Science for All Seasons and the Broad Institute visit: https://www.broadinstitute.org/partnerships/education/science-all-seasons/science-all-seasons-2016 Copyright Broad Institute, 2016. All rights reserved.
Views: 1606 Broad Institute
Data Analysis in SPSS Made Easy
 
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Use simple data analysis techniques in SPSS to analyze survey questions.
Views: 858151 Claus Ebster
Interpret Your Sleep Report Data From SleepyHead Free Software Monitoring Program Free CPAP Advice
 
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FreeCPAPAdvice.com and FreeCPAPAdvice.com/forum founder showing how to interpret the SleepyHead Software data for monitoring and tracking your own CPAP, BiPAP, APAP therapy. Questions about PAP therapy or sleep? Join the free forum at freecpapadvice.com/forum.
Views: 61970 TheLankyLefty27
MPG Primer: gnomAD: Using large genomic data sets to interpret human genetic variation (2019)
 
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January 10th, 2019 MPG Primer: gnomAD: Using large genomic data sets to interpret human genetic variation Anne O’Donnell-Luria, PhD Associate Director, Center for Medelian Genomics, Broad Institute; Clinician, Boston Children's Hospital The Primer on Medical and Population Genetics is a series of informal weekly discussions of basic genetics topics that relate to human populations and disease. Experts from across the Broad Institute community give in-depth introductions to the basic principles of complex trait genetics, including human genetic variation, genotyping, DNA sequencing methods, statistics, data analysis, and more. Videos of these sessions are made freely available for viewing here and are geared toward a wide audience that includes research technicians, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and established investigators just entering the field. For more information, please visit: -Program in Medical Population Genetics (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/224/) -Primer videos (http://www.broadinstitute.org/node/1339/) Copyright Broad Institute, 2019. All rights reserved.
Views: 427 Broad Institute
Trends in Multiparameter Flow Cytometry in Hematology - Dr. Brent Wood
 
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Flow cytometry is increasingly utilized as primary tool for the diagnosis of hematopoietic neoplasia in a clinical laboratory setting. The use of increased numbers of simultaneous fluorochromes offers the following potential advantages: increased accuracy of population identification, the ability to make better use of small specimens where cell number is a limiting factor, the processing of fewer tubes with the consequent reduction in reagents, technologist time and instrument time, the more efficient analysis of large numbers of cells which is important for the detection of small cell populations, and ultimately improved standardization. Brent Wood, associate professor of the hematology division in the department of laboratory medicine at the University of Washington discusses practical issues surrounding the implementation of high-level multicolor flow cytometry in a clinical laboratory setting and illustration of the power of the technology. Dr. Brent Wood
Views: 22170 UW Video
ROC Curves and Area Under the Curve (AUC) Explained
 
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An ROC curve is the most commonly used way to visualize the performance of a binary classifier, and AUC is (arguably) the best way to summarize its performance in a single number. As such, gaining a deep understanding of ROC curves and AUC is beneficial for data scientists, machine learning practitioners, and medical researchers (among others). SUBSCRIBE to learn data science with Python: https://www.youtube.com/dataschool?sub_confirmation=1 JOIN the "Data School Insiders" community and receive exclusive rewards: https://www.patreon.com/dataschool RESOURCES: - Transcript and screenshots: https://www.dataschool.io/roc-curves-and-auc-explained/ - Visualization: http://www.navan.name/roc/ - Research paper: http://people.inf.elte.hu/kiss/13dwhdm/roc.pdf LET'S CONNECT! - Newsletter: https://www.dataschool.io/subscribe/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/justmarkham - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DataScienceSchool/ - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justmarkham/
Views: 316489 Data School
IPPCR 2015: A Research Question and Implications for Efficient Clinical Trials
 
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IPPCR 2015: A Research Question and Implications for Efficient Clinical Trials Air date: Monday, October 19, 2015, 5:00:00 PM Category: IPPCR Runtime: 01:34:45 Description: The Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research (IPPCR) is a course to train participants on how to effectively conduct clinical research. The course focuses on the spectrum of clinical research and the research process by highlighting epidemiologic methods, study design, protocol preparation, patient monitoring, quality assurance, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues. For more information go to https://ippcr.nihtraining.com/login.php Author: John H. Powers, III, M.D., NIAID, NIH Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19250
Views: 19993 nihvcast
Liver Function Tests (LFTs) Explained Clearly by MedCram.com
 
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Understand liver function tests (LFT) with clear illustrations from Dr. Roger Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. Includes discussion of direct (conjugated) and indirect (unconjugated) bilirubin, cholestasis, alkaline phosphatase, GGT, Gilbert's syndrome, jaundice, and more. This video on liver function tests is lecture 2 of 4 on the liver. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.